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dc.contributor.authorCole, Mike
dc.contributor.authorMaisuria, Alpesh
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-14T21:07:59Z
dc.date.available2009-01-14T21:07:59Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationJournal for Critical Education Policy Studies, 5(1).
dc.identifier.issn1740-2743
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/47392
dc.descriptionNote: The Journal for Critical Education Policy Studies is a free e-journal published by The Institute for Education Policy Studies (IEPS).
dc.description.abstractThe London bombings of 7th July, 2007 (7/7) were a pivotal moment in British society, not only because of the loss of life and injury, but because it was the first time Britain had been attacked by non-white British citizens. This point was underscored by Chancellor Gordon Brown when he stressed that ‘the uncomfortable facts’ have to be faced that the bombers were ‘British citizens, British born, apparently integrated into our communities, who were prepared to maim and kill fellow British citizens’. Here we assess competing explanations for the role of ‘race’ in contemporary society: Critical Race Theory (CRT) and Racialisation. Two central tenets of CRT are critiqued from a Marxist perspective, and the Marxist concept of racialisation is put forward as having most purchase in explaining manifestations of intensified Islamophobia and xenoracism in post 7/7 Britain.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe Institute for Education Policy Studies
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jceps.com/index.php?pageID=article&articleID=85
dc.subjectCritical Race Theory
dc.subjectCRT
dc.subjectRacialisation
dc.subjectImperialism
dc.subjectTerrorism
dc.subjectMarxist theory
dc.subjectRacism
dc.subjectIslamophobia
dc.titleShut the f*** up, you have no rights here: Critical Race Theory and Racialisation in post-7/7 racist Britain.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal for Critical Education Policy Studies
html.description.abstractThe London bombings of 7th July, 2007 (7/7) were a pivotal moment in British society, not only because of the loss of life and injury, but because it was the first time Britain had been attacked by non-white British citizens. This point was underscored by Chancellor Gordon Brown when he stressed that ‘the uncomfortable facts’ have to be faced that the bombers were ‘British citizens, British born, apparently integrated into our communities, who were prepared to maim and kill fellow British citizens’. Here we assess competing explanations for the role of ‘race’ in contemporary society: Critical Race Theory (CRT) and Racialisation. Two central tenets of CRT are critiqued from a Marxist perspective, and the Marxist concept of racialisation is put forward as having most purchase in explaining manifestations of intensified Islamophobia and xenoracism in post 7/7 Britain.


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