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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Rob
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-14T20:10:15Z
dc.date.available2009-01-14T20:10:15Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationTeaching in Higher Education, 12(5/6): 683-695.
dc.identifier.issn1470-1294
dc.identifier.issn1356-2517
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13562510701596240
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/47388
dc.description.abstractIn the quasi-marketised environment of the new, mass higher education (HE), centralised policy continues to dictate conditions, and traditionally stable sources of income are being made increasingly unreliable. An increasing emphasis on student support within HE institutions (HEIs) has been made necessary by targets for student numbers and the funding that rests on these numbers. These tensions have been added to for 'post-1992' universities, by the Widening Participation initiative that brings with it particular issues around recruitment and retention. Rather than focusing on the models and systems of support that are being developed in different HE settings and their effectiveness, the aim of this paper is to theorise the imperatives behind these, to look again at the context that informs their inception and how the various support structures position and identify students. Through this, the tensions that exist between financial incentives, 'bums on seats', Widening Participation and academic achievement rates will be explored.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13562510701596240
dc.subjectSupportive learning environments
dc.subjectStudents
dc.subjectRetention
dc.subjectWidening participation
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectPost-1992 universities
dc.subjectUK
dc.titleAn overview of research on student support: helping students to achieve or achieving institutional targets? Nurture or De-Nature?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalTeaching in Higher Education
html.description.abstractIn the quasi-marketised environment of the new, mass higher education (HE), centralised policy continues to dictate conditions, and traditionally stable sources of income are being made increasingly unreliable. An increasing emphasis on student support within HE institutions (HEIs) has been made necessary by targets for student numbers and the funding that rests on these numbers. These tensions have been added to for 'post-1992' universities, by the Widening Participation initiative that brings with it particular issues around recruitment and retention. Rather than focusing on the models and systems of support that are being developed in different HE settings and their effectiveness, the aim of this paper is to theorise the imperatives behind these, to look again at the context that informs their inception and how the various support structures position and identify students. Through this, the tensions that exist between financial incentives, 'bums on seats', Widening Participation and academic achievement rates will be explored.


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