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dc.contributor.authorScarff, William
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-10T15:22:07Z
dc.date.available2008-12-10T15:22:07Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationIn: Proceedings of the UFHRD Ninth International Conference on Human Resource Development Research and Practice Across Europe: May 21-23, 2008 (Ref. 4.74). Lille, France: IESEG School of Management.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/42184
dc.description.abstractKnowledge transfer partnerships (ktps), numbering over 100 in the UK, form the background to this paper. Benefits of the partnerships are noted as follows: to the British economy, to the participating company, to the associate or trainee employee and to the University that manages the programmes. Mentoring theory and continuing professional development (cpd) are mentioned, though not extensively. The lead author has developed the unique role of the ktp mentor. The focus is on the mentor’s assistance made available to the associate. Two key strengths, checked with present associates, are identified. The first strength is the utterly confidential nature of the process of mentoring. The second strength is the absence of involvement in the day to day running of any partnership. The mentor is outside the formal management structure, not even taking part in selecting suitable associates. The mentor assists in cpd, in identifying skills, personal strengths and weaknesses, and towards the end of the contract in exploring career options with the associate. At all times the autonomy of the associate is respected. The authors conclude that the mentoring role is valuable well received and that it will continue, building on the key strengths noted above.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity Forum for Human Resource Development (UFHRD)
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ufhrd.co.uk/wordpress/?p=474
dc.subjectMentoring
dc.subjectMentor
dc.subjectMentee
dc.subjectCPD
dc.subjectKnowledge transfer partnership
dc.subjectCareer development
dc.subjectUniversities
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectWolverhampton Business School
dc.subjectUK
dc.titleMentoring: the knowledge transfer partnership experience in the University of Wolverhampton Business School.
dc.typeConference contribution
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-21T11:59:24Z
html.description.abstractKnowledge transfer partnerships (ktps), numbering over 100 in the UK, form the background to this paper. Benefits of the partnerships are noted as follows: to the British economy, to the participating company, to the associate or trainee employee and to the University that manages the programmes. Mentoring theory and continuing professional development (cpd) are mentioned, though not extensively. The lead author has developed the unique role of the ktp mentor. The focus is on the mentor’s assistance made available to the associate. Two key strengths, checked with present associates, are identified. The first strength is the utterly confidential nature of the process of mentoring. The second strength is the absence of involvement in the day to day running of any partnership. The mentor is outside the formal management structure, not even taking part in selecting suitable associates. The mentor assists in cpd, in identifying skills, personal strengths and weaknesses, and towards the end of the contract in exploring career options with the associate. At all times the autonomy of the associate is respected. The authors conclude that the mentoring role is valuable well received and that it will continue, building on the key strengths noted above.


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