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dc.contributor.authorMassey, Graham R.
dc.contributor.authorDawes, Philip L.
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-09T10:45:09Z
dc.date.available2008-12-09T10:45:09Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationIndustrial Marketing Management, 36(8): 1118-1129
dc.identifier.issn00198501
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.indmarman.2006.05.017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/42075
dc.description.abstractFocusing on the working relationship between Marketing Managers and Sales Managers, our study examines two dimensions of interpersonal conflict: dysfunctional conflict and functional conflict. Drawing on relevant theory, we include three communication variables – frequency, bidirectionality, and quality – as antecedents in our structural model. Using these explanatory variables we predict the two conflict dimensions, and in turn, use these same three communication variables, and the two conflict dimensions to predict our ultimate endogenous variable — perceived relationship effectiveness. Overall, our model has high explanatory power, and we find support for nine of the thirteen hypotheses. More specifically, two of the three communication variables – communication quality and bidirectionality – significantly impact on both forms of conflict, and relationship effectiveness, though communication frequency only influenced the quality of communication between the Marketing Managers and the Sales Managers. In addition, the variables in our model better predict the levels of functional conflict in the Marketing/Sales relationship than dysfunctional conflict. Finally, an important new finding in this research is that the overall level of dysfunctional conflict between these two functional managers is relatively low, while functional conflict is high.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.subjectCross-functional relationships
dc.subjectFunctional conflict
dc.subjectDysfunctional conflict
dc.subjectRelationship effectiveness
dc.subjectPerception
dc.subjectMarketing
dc.subjectRelationships
dc.subjectSales
dc.subjectConflict
dc.subjectWorking relationships
dc.titleThe antecedents and consequences of functional and dysfunctional conflict between Marketing Managers and Sales Managers
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalIndustrial Marketing Management
html.description.abstractFocusing on the working relationship between Marketing Managers and Sales Managers, our study examines two dimensions of interpersonal conflict: dysfunctional conflict and functional conflict. Drawing on relevant theory, we include three communication variables – frequency, bidirectionality, and quality – as antecedents in our structural model. Using these explanatory variables we predict the two conflict dimensions, and in turn, use these same three communication variables, and the two conflict dimensions to predict our ultimate endogenous variable — perceived relationship effectiveness. Overall, our model has high explanatory power, and we find support for nine of the thirteen hypotheses. More specifically, two of the three communication variables – communication quality and bidirectionality – significantly impact on both forms of conflict, and relationship effectiveness, though communication frequency only influenced the quality of communication between the Marketing Managers and the Sales Managers. In addition, the variables in our model better predict the levels of functional conflict in the Marketing/Sales relationship than dysfunctional conflict. Finally, an important new finding in this research is that the overall level of dysfunctional conflict between these two functional managers is relatively low, while functional conflict is high.


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