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dc.contributor.authorMahoney, Alison J.
dc.contributor.authorDevonport, Tracey J.
dc.contributor.authorLane, Andrew M.
dc.date.accessioned2008-11-12T10:42:20Z
dc.date.available2008-11-12T10:42:20Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sports Science and Medicine, 7(1): 39-46
dc.identifier.issn1303-2968
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/40778
dc.descriptionThe rights to this article are held by the Journal of Sports Science and Medicine, an Open Access journal. The full text can be accessed at the link given above.
dc.description.abstractThe present study used quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the relationship between interval feedback and selfefficacy toward umpiring netball games. Grade “A” level umpires (n = 7) provided feedback to umpires (n = 40) under two conditions; 1) interval feedback given at the end of one tournament game (after 14 minutes) and again at the end of a second consecutive game (after 28 minutes), and 2) feedback at the end of the game (after 28 minutes). Umpires in both conditions completed an Umpiring Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (USEQ) which was a 14-item measure designed to assess factors relevant to netball umpire performance. Participants completed the USEQ immediately before game one, during the interval, and after a second game. Umpires also completed a feedback questionnaire which enabled them to reflect on the feedback received. A repeated measures factorial (time x feedback condition) ANOVA indicated no significant interaction effect (F = 0.05, p > .05), and no main effect for condition (F = 0.06, p > .05) or time (F = 1.61, p > .05) for changes in self-efficacy. Although there were no significant effects, qualitative data alluded to aspects of feedback perceived to enhance umpire selfefficacy, thus identifying ways in which feedback might have a more consistent effect. Practical implications of the study in relation to verbal interval feedback are discussed.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAsist Group
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jssm.org/vol7/n1/6/v7n1-6abst.php
dc.subjectSports psychology
dc.subjectSelf-regulation
dc.subjectPsychometrics
dc.subjectSelf-efficacy
dc.subjectConfidence
dc.subjectFeedback
dc.subjectNetball
dc.subjectUmpires
dc.subjectPerformance measurement
dc.titleThe effects of interval feedback on the self-efficacy of netball umpires
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Sports Science and Medicine
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-20T16:26:17Z
html.description.abstractThe present study used quantitative and qualitative methods to explore the relationship between interval feedback and selfefficacy toward umpiring netball games. Grade “A” level umpires (n = 7) provided feedback to umpires (n = 40) under two conditions; 1) interval feedback given at the end of one tournament game (after 14 minutes) and again at the end of a second consecutive game (after 28 minutes), and 2) feedback at the end of the game (after 28 minutes). Umpires in both conditions completed an Umpiring Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (USEQ) which was a 14-item measure designed to assess factors relevant to netball umpire performance. Participants completed the USEQ immediately before game one, during the interval, and after a second game. Umpires also completed a feedback questionnaire which enabled them to reflect on the feedback received. A repeated measures factorial (time x feedback condition) ANOVA indicated no significant interaction effect (F = 0.05, p > .05), and no main effect for condition (F = 0.06, p > .05) or time (F = 1.61, p > .05) for changes in self-efficacy. Although there were no significant effects, qualitative data alluded to aspects of feedback perceived to enhance umpire selfefficacy, thus identifying ways in which feedback might have a more consistent effect. Practical implications of the study in relation to verbal interval feedback are discussed.


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