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dc.contributor.authorSimkins, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Clive L.
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-21T15:07:48Z
dc.date.available2006-08-21T15:07:48Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationCELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2001/02
dc.identifier.isbn0954211618
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/3975
dc.descriptionReport of a CELT project on supporting students through innovation and research
dc.description.abstractThe Division of Environmental and Analytical Sciences uses the Wolverhampton Online Learning Framework (WOLF) for part of its module delivery programme at all 3 levels within all Awards. This initiative followed from the mission statement that the University of Wolverhampton is committed to broadening access to the widest range of students capable of succeeding in higher education. It is however difficult to assess the level of success achieved by WOLF-based modules in terms of the student’s true understanding of module concepts, although end-of-module evaluation forms completed by students have allowed some feedback on satisfaction of the way in which modules use WOLF. There has been limited information available on specific learning and teaching issues that might help guide the style of module delivery using the WOLF system. Indeed if WOLF-based modules are intended to be an alternative form of delivery for modules that are delivered by conventional methods, evaluations for the level of true understanding achieved by students (whatever their chosen platform for studying the module) would be very useful information to develop. The research involved canvassing the opinions of students on modules that are committed to the use of WOLF as part of the module delivery. Tracking facilities within the administrator’s role on WOLF gives feedback on the amount of time students spend on WOLF pages. However it is not possible to evaluate the level of learning or understanding that has been achieved by students from tracking statistics alone. There are therefore 3 main aims for this research: 1. To evaluate the level of deep learning achieved by students studying environmental science students who have accessed the modules via WOLF. 2. To study the quality and style of approaches to learning adopted by students that have accessed modules through WOLF. 3. To assess the effectiveness of module delivery by utilising WOLF.
dc.format.extent155493 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhampton
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/celt
dc.subjectLearning outcomes
dc.subjectWOLF
dc.subjectWolverhampton Online Learning Framework
dc.subjectTeaching methods
dc.subjectVirtual Learning Environment
dc.subjectEnvironmental science
dc.subjectUndergraduate students
dc.subjectVLE
dc.titleAn evaluation of deep learning achieved by students studying environmental science modules using the Wolverhampton Online Learning Framework (WOLF)
dc.typeChapter in book
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-21T11:52:10Z
html.description.abstractThe Division of Environmental and Analytical Sciences uses the Wolverhampton Online Learning Framework (WOLF) for part of its module delivery programme at all 3 levels within all Awards. This initiative followed from the mission statement that the University of Wolverhampton is committed to broadening access to the widest range of students capable of succeeding in higher education. It is however difficult to assess the level of success achieved by WOLF-based modules in terms of the student’s true understanding of module concepts, although end-of-module evaluation forms completed by students have allowed some feedback on satisfaction of the way in which modules use WOLF. There has been limited information available on specific learning and teaching issues that might help guide the style of module delivery using the WOLF system. Indeed if WOLF-based modules are intended to be an alternative form of delivery for modules that are delivered by conventional methods, evaluations for the level of true understanding achieved by students (whatever their chosen platform for studying the module) would be very useful information to develop. The research involved canvassing the opinions of students on modules that are committed to the use of WOLF as part of the module delivery. Tracking facilities within the administrator’s role on WOLF gives feedback on the amount of time students spend on WOLF pages. However it is not possible to evaluate the level of learning or understanding that has been achieved by students from tracking statistics alone. There are therefore 3 main aims for this research: 1. To evaluate the level of deep learning achieved by students studying environmental science students who have accessed the modules via WOLF. 2. To study the quality and style of approaches to learning adopted by students that have accessed modules through WOLF. 3. To assess the effectiveness of module delivery by utilising WOLF.


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