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dc.contributor.authorHockings, Christine
dc.date.accessioned2006-08-10T09:52:06Z
dc.date.available2006-08-10T09:52:06Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationCELT Learning and Teaching Projects 2001/02
dc.identifier.isbn0954211618
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/3802
dc.descriptionReport of a CELT project on supporting students through innovation and research
dc.description.abstractIn 2000, the University of Wolverhampton's Learning and Teaching Strategy funded an innovation project to change a traditionally taught module to a module based on social constructivist principles. The project team found that whilst the changes to the module improved student learning, they had overlooked the demands these alternative methods would make on the teaching skills and expertise of colleagues. The changes not only required lecturers to think differently about how they teach, they also required them to act differently in the classroom e.g. from ‘telling’ to ‘questioning’ behaviour. Getting students to actively engage with each other and negotiate meaning, rather than imparting knowledge, seemed particularly problematic. At times it was all too tempting to revert back to telling students what they ‘should’ know rather than facilitating the generation of students’ own ideas and encouraging a spirit of enquiry. Of course there could be many factors that affect classroom practice, including the teacher’s beliefs about the students and the subject she is teaching. I therefore conjectured that in order to develop appropriate instructional behaviour we would first need to understand and work on the factors affecting classroom behaviour.
dc.format.extent1023163 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhampton
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/celt
dc.subjectInstructional video
dc.subjectTeaching skills
dc.subjectMentoring
dc.subjectStudents
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectLearning
dc.subjectClassroom practice
dc.subjectTeacher behaviour
dc.titleDeveloping alternative teaching skills through a programme of video analysis and mentoring
dc.typeChapter in book
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-20T13:26:25Z
html.description.abstractIn 2000, the University of Wolverhampton's Learning and Teaching Strategy funded an innovation project to change a traditionally taught module to a module based on social constructivist principles. The project team found that whilst the changes to the module improved student learning, they had overlooked the demands these alternative methods would make on the teaching skills and expertise of colleagues. The changes not only required lecturers to think differently about how they teach, they also required them to act differently in the classroom e.g. from ‘telling’ to ‘questioning’ behaviour. Getting students to actively engage with each other and negotiate meaning, rather than imparting knowledge, seemed particularly problematic. At times it was all too tempting to revert back to telling students what they ‘should’ know rather than facilitating the generation of students’ own ideas and encouraging a spirit of enquiry. Of course there could be many factors that affect classroom practice, including the teacher’s beliefs about the students and the subject she is teaching. I therefore conjectured that in order to develop appropriate instructional behaviour we would first need to understand and work on the factors affecting classroom behaviour.


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