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dc.contributor.authorGlaser, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Carolyn
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-20T11:48:31Z
dc.date.available2008-08-20T11:48:31Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.isbn2-88046-810-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/35960
dc.descriptionThe book discusses and analyses the complex components that relate to visual hierarchy in the context of both print and screen based solutions in graphic design. In particular, the book examines the creation of hierarchies utilising type, image and colour.
dc.description.abstractThe researchers investigate how graphic designers employ changes of scale, composition, colour, and tone to influence the sequencing of information. They are also interested in how designers select the style and content of imagery, as well as how they use language to affect audience perception. This research emerges from anecdotal evidence of concerns amongst colleagues and the observation of need at numerous design institutions. The book discusses and juxtaposes typography driven and image driven aspects of visual hierarchy, in a manner not previously undertaken within the area of visual communication. Findings are illustrated not only by the work of international designers, but also with the aid of examples that have been specifically created by the researchers. The book is both written and designed by the authors to ensure control over verbal and visual interpretation. Glaser’s primary focus is on the visual aspects, while Knight’s is upon linguistic content.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSwitzerland: Rotovision SA
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/Default.aspx?page=16091
dc.titleThe Graphic Designer's Guide to Effective Visual Communication: Creating Hierarchies with Type Image and Colour
dc.typeAuthored book
html.description.abstractThe researchers investigate how graphic designers employ changes of scale, composition, colour, and tone to influence the sequencing of information. They are also interested in how designers select the style and content of imagery, as well as how they use language to affect audience perception. This research emerges from anecdotal evidence of concerns amongst colleagues and the observation of need at numerous design institutions. The book discusses and juxtaposes typography driven and image driven aspects of visual hierarchy, in a manner not previously undertaken within the area of visual communication. Findings are illustrated not only by the work of international designers, but also with the aid of examples that have been specifically created by the researchers. The book is both written and designed by the authors to ensure control over verbal and visual interpretation. Glaser’s primary focus is on the visual aspects, while Knight’s is upon linguistic content.


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