Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Michael
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Mark
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.
dc.date.accessioned2008-08-13T09:52:03Z
dc.date.available2008-08-13T09:52:03Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 22(4): 1379-1381
dc.identifier.issn1533-4287
dc.identifier.pmid18545163
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/35253
dc.description.abstractThis study compared peak power estimated using 4 commonly used regression equations with actual peak power derived from force platform data in a group of adolescent basketball players. Twenty-five elite junior male basketball players (age, 16.5 +/- 0.5 years; mass, 74.2 +/- 11.8 kg; height, 181.8 +/- 8.1 cm) volunteered to participate in the study. Actual peak power was determined using a countermovement vertical jump on a force platform. Estimated peak power was determined using countermovement jump height and body mass. All 4 prediction equations were significantly related to actual peak power (all p < 0.01). Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated significant differences between actual peak power and estimate peak power from all 4 prediction equations (p < 0.001). Bonferroni post hoc tests indicated that estimated peak power was significantly lower than actual peak power for all 4 prediction equations. Ratio limits of agreement for actual peak power and estimated peak power were 8% for the Harman et al. and Sayers squat jump prediction equations, 12% for the Canavan and Vescovi equation, and 6% for the Sayers countermovement jump equation. In all cases peak power was underestimated.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams and Wilkins in association with National Strength and Conditioning Association
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nsca-jscr.org/pt/re/jscr/abstract.00124278-200807000-00049.htm;jsessionid=LvpGcyhJQhvSRnQmXgcyrK2cQrCVn86Jb8KKQZ91h1v4xyLwTQlM!-1123973585!181195628!8091!-1
dc.subjectSports Medicine
dc.subjectBasketball
dc.subjectJump height
dc.subjectPerformance measurement
dc.subjectMale athletes
dc.subjectVertical jump
dc.subjectForce platform
dc.subjectPrediction equation
dc.titleEvaluation of peak power prediction equations in male basketball players
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
html.description.abstractThis study compared peak power estimated using 4 commonly used regression equations with actual peak power derived from force platform data in a group of adolescent basketball players. Twenty-five elite junior male basketball players (age, 16.5 +/- 0.5 years; mass, 74.2 +/- 11.8 kg; height, 181.8 +/- 8.1 cm) volunteered to participate in the study. Actual peak power was determined using a countermovement vertical jump on a force platform. Estimated peak power was determined using countermovement jump height and body mass. All 4 prediction equations were significantly related to actual peak power (all p < 0.01). Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated significant differences between actual peak power and estimate peak power from all 4 prediction equations (p < 0.001). Bonferroni post hoc tests indicated that estimated peak power was significantly lower than actual peak power for all 4 prediction equations. Ratio limits of agreement for actual peak power and estimated peak power were 8% for the Harman et al. and Sayers squat jump prediction equations, 12% for the Canavan and Vescovi equation, and 6% for the Sayers countermovement jump equation. In all cases peak power was underestimated.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record