• Talk like an expert: the construction of expertise in news comments concerning climate change

      Coen, Sharon; Meredith, Joanne; Woods, Ruth; Fernandez, Ana (SAGE, 2020-12-30)
      This paper explores how readers of UK newspapers construct expertise around climate change (CC). It draws on 300 on-line readers’ comments on news items in The Guardian, Daily Mail and The Telegraph, concerning the release of the IPCC report calling for immediate action on CC. Comments were analysed using discursive psychology. We identified a series of discursive strategies that commenters adopted to present themselves as experts in their commentary. The (mostly indirect) use of category entitlements (implicitly claiming themselves as expert) and the presentation of one’s argument as factual (based on direct or indirect technical knowledge or common sense) emerged as common ways in which readers made claims to expertise, both among the supporters and among the sceptics of CC science. Our findings indicate that expertise is a fluid concept, constructed in diverse ways, with important implications for public engagement with CC science.
    • Teacher candidate perceptions of the edTPA in physical and health education

      Holden, Shelley L; Parkes, Craig; O’Leary, Nick (Informa UK Limited, 2020-08-21)
      The purpose of this exploratory case study was to investigate physical and health education teacher candidate’s perceptions of factors influencing effective implementation of edTPA at one teacher preparation program in the Southeastern United States. The participants were six physical and health education teacher candidates who had recently completed the edTPA portfolio. In line with the principles of case study methodology data were collected through the application of a Qualtrics survey, followed by focus group and one-on-one interviews. NVivo 11 Pro software package was employed to analyse data using analytic induction and constant comparison techniques. The analysis revealed that the factors that influenced participant experiences of the edTPA fell into four themes: (a) tandem cooperating teachers and teacher candidates’ edTPA learning, (b) essential faculty support, (c) boot camp workshop support, and (d) effective mock submissions. The study reveals that there are a number of strategic interventions that can improve the effectiveness of edTPA programs. These include, but are not limited to, targeted training for cooperating teachers, involving physical and health education faculty in boot camp workshops, and assigning mock edTPA assignments during methods courses.
    • Teacher socialization in physical education: new perspectives

      O'Leary, Nick (Informa UK Limited, 2019-07-24)
      The socialization of physical education teachers has a significant impact on teaching and learning practices. Despite the plethora of previous research examining physical education teachers’ lives and careers, new research and perspectives are always required since educational, social and political cultures change. For this reason, this first edited collection of scholarship on physical education socialization for nearly three decades is long overdue. Teaching Socialization in Physical Education: New Perspectives adopts an innovative, cross-cultural approach, examining how physical education teachers develop and considering the factors that impact on their development and pedagogical practices, in addition to detailing future socialization research possibilities in the subject.
    • Teachers' perspectives on effective school leadership

      Harris, Alma; Day, Christopher; Hadfield, Mark (Routledge, 2003)
      This paper considers teachers' perspectives on effective school leadership. It draws upon the findings from a study of effective leadership conducted by a research team from the University of Nottingham [1]. This research study considered effective leadership from the perspectives of different stakeholders within the English schooling system. This provided an opportunity to analyse leadership in a holistic way and to consider leadership from a variety of different perspectives.
    • Teachers' views on students' experiences of community involvement and citizenship education

      Hampden-Thompson, G.; Jeffes, J.; Lord, P.; Bramley, G.; Davies, I.; Tsouroufli, M.; Sundaram, V. (SAGE Publications, 2015-02-26)
      Based upon the findings of a national survey of school coordinators and leaders on citizenship and community cohesion, this research indicates that teachers perceive their students to feel a sense of belonging to multiple communities, each with their own required actions for effective participation. There appears to be wide variation in the characteristics of students’ engagement in community activities depending on their individual needs and circumstances. Whilst there is convincing evidence of schools successfully implementing strategies to equip students with a conceptual understanding of their roles as citizens, the research also identifies a need to develop students’ practical skills and self-efficacy to interact with their immediate and wider communities. In order to support students to participate most effectively in their communities, there is a need for schools to provide tailored support to those groups of students who may otherwise be least likely to participate in community activities.
    • ‘Teaching Excellence’ in Higher Education: A comparative study of English and Australian academics’ perspectives

      Bartram, Brendan; Hathaway, Tanya; Rao, Namrata (Taylor and Francis, 2018-07-26)
      In the current higher education (HE) environment, indicators of ‘teaching excellence’ (TE) are increasingly under the spotlight. The literature offers a wide range of models and perspectives, but also highlights the need for greater (comparative) scrutiny of the perceptions of those at the centre – staff teaching across the disciplines in different countries. This article aims to contribute to ongoing debates by investigating and comparing the views of 120 academic staff teaching in one of two countries – England and Australia – in an attempt to deepen our appreciation of their definitions and understandings. The findings from this two-stage enquiry using online questionnaires and interviews indicate broad commonalities in the ways academics define TE, centred on facilitative, interactive pedagogy related to individual professional aspirations; they also reveal widely shared reservations about the term’s legitimacy and institutional/marketized (ab)use. As such, the findings offer policy-makers and institutions useful insights at a time where TE definitions and metrics are growing global pre-occupations.
    • Teaching in Emergency Medicine

      Matheson, David (Austin Publishing Group, 2016-03)
      Teaching is that rare thing among occupations in that it is one that everyone has experienced in one form or another. Most medical practitioners and other healthcare professionals in emergency medicine have attended school, generally for 12 or more years and all will have undergone further training, whether in medicine, nursing, physiotherapy or whatever. They will have encountered a diversity of teachers; have been impressed by some and perhaps depressed by others. Because being taught is such a universal experience, the myth persists in many places that just because an individual is an expert in a subject that s/he can teach it. Good teachers frequently demonstrate the skill of making the complex accessible. They may demonstrate this in all manners of style but they will always do so in a way that makes the learner feel that this material is open to the likes of them, whoever or whatever that may be. A lasting impact of these skillful performances is that the learner may be left with the impression that teaching is easy. The good teacher teaches with ease and it is easy to lose sight, or never to see at all, the level of skill, attentiveness and empathy that good teaching demands. However, to claim that one can teach a topic just because one has been taught the topic is akin to saying that one can treat disease as a result of having been ill. In my own country, the UK, it is generally clinically-related research which carries value and teaching is assumed to be doable by anyone. A light on the horizon is the increasing demands from the UK General Medical Council that those who teach medical students and residents be able to teach and that they have some training.
    • Teaching in the age of Covid-19

      Jandric, Petar; Hayes, Sarah (Springer, 2020-08-07)
    • Teaching in the age of Covid-19 - a longitudinal study

      Jandrić, Petar; Bozkurt, Aras; McKee, Miranda; Hayes, Sarah (Springer, 2021-08-19)
      This article presents a longitudinal study of global teaching and learning experiences during the Covid-19 pandemic. The study is based on material presented in two articles written 1 year apart from each other by a group of 84 authors from 20 countries. The first article, ‘Teaching in the Age of Covid-19’, consists of short testimonies and workspace photographs collected between 18 March and 5 May 2020. The second article, ‘Teaching in the Age of Covid-19 – One Year Later’, consists of short testimonies and workspace photographs collected between 17 March and 31 May 2021. This material is analysed in several different ways. Some parts of the paper treat the testimonies as personal, positional, narratives, while other parts of the paper examine the testimonies for what they represent as data. Readers are invited to read the original testimonies, view the original images and move back and forth between both narratives and data. As narratives, each author has demonstrated their individual postdigital positionality through praxis. As data, these mutually constitutive accounts offer a much larger, powerful commentary, on the position of educators across the globe during this pandemic. The discussion and conclusion blend the two understandings into a postdigital data-narrato-logy, where data and narrative interact in ways similar to interactions between theory and practice within the concept of praxis.
    • Teaching in the age of Covid-19—1 year later

      Jandrić, Petar; Hayes, David; Levinson, Paul; Christensen, Line Lisberg; Lukoko, Happiness Onesmo; Kihwele, Jimmy Ezekiel; Brown, James Benedict; Reitz, Charles; Mozelius, Peter; Nejad, Harry G; et al. (Springer, 2021-08-10)
    • Team Roles: Their Relationships to Character Strengths and Job Satisfaction.

      Platt, Tracey; Ruch, Willibald; Gander, Fabian; Hofmann, Jennifer (Taylor & Francis, 2016-11-14)
      Translator disclaimer Full Article Figures & data References Citations Metrics Reprints & Permissions Get access Abstract Well-functioning teamwork has frequently been linked to increased work satisfaction and performance. However, there is a paucity of research on the different types of roles in teams. Recently, a new model of role behavior in teams was proposed (comprising seven such team roles: Idea creator, information gatherer, decision-maker, implementer, influencer, energizer, and relationship manager), but an assessment instrument was lacking so far. The present study describes the construction of an instrument for the assessment of these roles in two samples (N = 291 and 274) and examines their relationships with character strengths and job satisfaction. Results show that the team roles are positively related to job satisfaction and most character strengths. The findings support the important role of character strengths in work-related settings and lay ground for further studies on team roles.
    • The technical and vocational provision in England: A comparative study with the Austrian secondary system

      Starr, Sean; Bartram, Brendan (Routledge, 2017-08-07)
      This chapter reviews the reintroduction of apprenticeships in England, with a focus on education into employment. This is achieved by comparing English secondary schools with the Austrian system. The Austrian system was chosen due to its having over 40 years of very diverse educational provision, including a significant vocational and apprenticeship programme. The curriculum offer in England is determined by the national curriculum and supported by governmental accountability measures, which focus on academic subjects. Technical and vocational education and training (TVET) has been neglected in England, regardless of the student's interests, passion or abilities. With the introduction of more specialised TVET provision in England, it may possibly allow for routes to represent 'vocationalised' general education. The Austrian education system is run by the individual federal states and therefore there is no national curriculum standard as such. Intermediate and upper secondary technical and vocational schools/colleges offer pupils the possibility of choosing between different study courses.
    • Technical Data on Typologies of Interventions in Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 6b

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • A technique for subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue biopsy via a nondiathermy method

      Chachopoulos, Vasileios; Dinas, Petros C.; Chasioti, Markella; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Flouris, Andreas D. (Journal of Visualized Experiments, 2017-09-30)
      Adipose tissue biopsies offer tissue samples that, upon analysis, may provide insightful overviews of mechanisms relating to metabolism and disease. To obtain subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies in the abdominal area, researchers and physicians use either a surgical or a needlebased technique. However, surgical subcutaneous fat biopsies can offer tissue samples that may provide a more comprehensive overview of the complexities of biological indices in white adipose tissue. Usually, a surgical adipose tissue biopsy includes a diathermy treatment for cauterizing blood vessels to prevent excessive bleeding. Nevertheless, side effects, such as flash fires and skin lesions in the tissue, have been reported after diathermy. Therefore, we aimed to standardize a surgical abdominal adipose tissue biopsy performed under local anesthesia using a nondiathermy method. We conducted 115 subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies in healthy men using a non-diathermy abdominal surgical biopsy method. Our results showed three cases of excessive post-operation bleeding out of 115 operations (2.61%).In conclusion, our standardized subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue surgical biopsy using a non-diathermy method can be safely applied to healthy men at the bedside, with minimal side effects.
    • Technological unemployment and its educational discontents

      Jandrić, Petar; Hayes, Sarah (Helsinki University Press, 2020-08-11)
      This chapter introduces a post-digital perspective to relationships between technological unemployment and its educational discontents. It examines a possible future where digital technologies will destroy more jobs than they will create in three steps. First, an extensive literature overview identifies why people from various historical periods and working in various fields have perceived technological unemployment as a threat. Second, it distils six main areas of educational discontent in current literature: discontent with neoliberalization, discontent with automation, discontent with dehumanization, discontent with acceleration, discontent with content of work and discontent with educationalization. Concluding that educational discontent with technological unemployment identified in our work seems to have surprisingly little to do with either technology or with employment, it returns to the post-digital perspective to explain this result. Finally, it examines educational discontent of technological unemployment as an agent of change, and concludes that the notion of educational discontent with technological unemployment has the potential to help formulate new post-digital critical rage pedagogy.
    • Technology-assisted memory

      Mercer, Tom; Attrill, Alison; Fullwood, Chris (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016-09-20)
      Memory plays a crucial role in all aspects of life, yet forgetfulness and memory distortion is common. People are therefore willing to ‘offload’ memories onto external aids, including technology. This chapter explores the ways in which technology can change memory processes, and examines the wider implications of technology-assisted memory. The scientific evidence shows that whilst technology can sometimes damage remembering, there are positive applications too. This chapter reviews the benefits of technological memory aids and shows how they can support remembering within a variety of applied settings. The value of assistive technology for those with memory impairment is also discussed. The chapter concludes by outlining the wider implications of technological memory aids, and summarises the advantages of possessing a technology-assisted memory.
    • Teenage pregnancy in Africa: Trend and Determinants in the 21st Century

      Bellingham-Young, Denise; Odejimi, O (Journal of Health and Social Care Improvement, 2016-07)
      Background: Africa remains one of the continents with the highest levels of teenage pregnancies in the world. In spite of this, there are limited empirical research studies on determinants of teenage pregnancy in Africa. This study aims to investigate the trend and determinants of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Several social and economic factors appear to be the causes of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Therefore, understanding the association between teenage pregnancy and various social and economic factors would help reduce teenage pregnancy rate in Africa. Methods: Data sets from the World Bank Organisation of all Africa countries between 2000 and 2010 were obtained to conduct this study. The trends of average teenage pregnancy rate across all regions were examined using descriptive method. Also, the association between teenage pregnancy rate and various economic and social factors were investigated using multivariate statistics methods. Results: In all 52 countries examined there has been a significant reduction in the African teenage pregnancy rate between 2000 and 2010. In addition, correlation analysis carried out showed an inverse significant relationship with life expectancy, literacy rate and contraceptive prevalence. Further analysis reveals that female literacy rate is the most important predictor of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Conclusion: The findings of this research indicate that social and economic factors are important predictors of teenage pregnancy rate in Africa. Evidence from this study suggests that a practical approach to reducing the current teenage pregnancy rate is to develop strategies and policies that support and promotes female literacy.
    • Teenage pregnancy in Africa: trends and determinants in the 21st century

      Odejimi, Opeyemi; Bellingham-Young, Denise (University of Wolverhampton, 2016-08)
      Background: Africa remains one of the continents with the highest levels of teenage pregnancies in the world. In spite of this, there are limited empirical research studies on determinants of teenage pregnancy in Africa. This study aims to investigate the trend and determinants of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Several social and economic factors appear to be the causes of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Therefore, understanding the association between teenage pregnancy and various social and economic factors would help reduce teenage pregnancy rate in Africa. Methods: Data sets from the World Bank Organisation of all Africa countries between 2000 and 2010 were obtained to conduct this study. The trends of average teenage pregnancy rate across all regions were examined using descriptive method. Also, the association between teenage pregnancy rate and various economic and social factors were investigated using multivariate statistics methods. Results: In all 52 countries examined there has been a significant reduction in the African teenage pregnancy rate between 2000 and 2010. In addition, correlation analysis carried out showed an inverse significant relationship with life expectancy, literacy rate and contraceptive prevalence. Further analysis reveals that female literacy rate is the most important predictor of teenage pregnancy in Africa. Conclusion: The findings of this research indicate that social and economic factors are important predictors of teenage pregnancy rate in Africa. Evidence from this study suggests that a practical approach to reducing the current teenage pregnancy rate is to develop strategies and policies that support and promotes female literacy.
    • Temperature and humidity associated with increases in tuberculosis notifications: a time-series study in Hong Kong

      Xu, M; Li, Y; Liu, B; Chen, R; Sheng, L; Yan, S; Chen, H; Hou, J; Yuan, L; Ke, L; et al. (Cambridge University Press, 2020-12-28)
      Previous studies have revealed associations of meteorological factors with tuberculosis (TB) cases. However, few studies have examined their lag effects on TB cases. This study was aimed to analyse nonlinear lag effects of meteorological factors on the number of TB notifications in Hong Kong. Using a 22-year consecutive surveillance data in Hong Kong, we examined the association of monthly average temperature and relative humidity with temporal dynamics of the monthly number of TB notifications using a distributed lag nonlinear models combined with a Poisson regression. The relative risks (RRs) of TB notifications were >1.15 as monthly average temperatures were between 16.3 and 17.3 °C at lagged 13-15 months, reaching the peak risk of 1.18 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.35) when it was 16.8 °C at lagged 14 months. The RRs of TB notifications were >1.05 as relative humidities of 60.0-63.6% at lagged 9-11 months expanded to 68.0-71.0% at lagged 12-17 months, reaching the highest risk of 1.06 (95% CI 1.01-1.11) when it was 69.0% at lagged 13 months. The nonlinear and delayed effects of average temperature and relative humidity on TB epidemic were identified, which may provide a practical reference for improving the TB warning system.