• What do we mean by PDP? ePortfolio? and ePDP?

      Brett, Paul; Lawton, Megan; Purnell, Emma (University of Wolverhampton, 2008-03-01)
    • Emerging pedagogies using webcams, podcasting and YouTube in eportfolio

      Brett, Paul; Lawton, Megan; Purnell, Emma (University of Wolverhampton, 2008-03-01)
    • Best practice guide for the retreat model of staff development to design ePDP tasks

      Brett, Paul; Lawton, Megan; Purnell, Emma (Higher Education Academy, 2008-03-01)
    • Best practice guide for the design of ePDP tasks

      Brett, Paul; Lawton, Megan; Purnell, Emma (Higher Education Academy, 2008-03-01)
    • The Pathfinder Journey - Embedding ePortfolio at level 1

      Brett, Paul; Lawton, Megan; Purnell, Emma (Higher Education Academy, 2008-03-01)
    • Working class heroes

      Lawton, Megan (University of Wolverhampton, 2005-03-1)
      This research is the first stage in a longitudinal study of mature women learners from three feeder colleges to the University of Wolverhampton in three 'disciplines', nursing, teaching and psychology. The research questions I will address eventually are: to what extent have the aspirations of the women learners been met? What is the context in which these aspirations have been lived out? How can this inform institutional policy and strategy in the context of widening participation? Preliminary findings indicate that these women choose to take degree courses in vocational subjects because they see job opportunities in these fields, they are carers and therefore have personal experience and/or they have missed out on further and higher education earlier in their lives. The institution has developed various initiatives to raise the aspirations of these potential students particularly in the local area. This paper explores whether and how these students' aspirations have informed these initiatives.
    • Tell me the rules of the game so I can play too!

      Lawton, Megan (University of Teeside, 2007-09-01)
    • Personal Development Planning (PDP) using e-portfolio for CPD

      Lawton, Megan; Felce, Alison (School of the Built Environment, University of Salford, UK, 2007-07)
    • Developing materials and motivating Deaf Learners to read and write English via the internet

      Lawton, Megan (Charles University in Prague, The Karolinum Press, 2000-09)
    • 'To embed or not to embed' that is the question

      Cooper, Patricia; Dyson, Jean; Lawton, Megan; Marshall, Lindsey (2009-03)
    • PDP and ePortfolio systems: benefits, issues and challenges

      Lawton, Megan; Crispin, Dale; Robinson, Peter; Fenton, Rebecca (Foundation Degree Forward, 2009-01)
    • A little and often: unanticipated outcomes from an ePortfolio evaluation impacting on early identification of risk and non submission of work

      Lawton, Megan; Purnell, Emma (Aldinhe, 2010-03)
      Since 2005 all staff and students within the University of Wolverhampton have had access to an ePortfolio system - PebblePad. In 2007 the University ran a HEA Pathfinder Project 'embedding ePortfolio at level 1' which involved 1800 level 1 learners and 31 members of staff across all academic schools. The staff development activities used to develop teacher capabilities tried to mirror the student experience to great success. The knowledge gained from this project was then taken into a University-wide impact evaluation. The evaluation identified anticipated and unanticipated outcomes of pedagogic processes for personal development planning (PDP) and e-portfolio development. This paper will deal with two key areas: 1 the early identification of risk and 2 the reduction in non-submission of work. This work now feeds into the University's Blended Learning Strategy (2008). The overarching aims of this strategy are to enhance student learning and to improve each student's learning experience. This is articulated via student entitlements of which the following are directly addressed by this work: All students should be entitled to: formative assessment/s opportunities on line with meaningful electronic assessment feedback; have the opportunity to participate in electronic Personal Development Planning (ePDP); The paper will look at how an ePortfolio system was used to develop learner skills, learner support issues and how staff from a central department worked with discipline-based staff to help support their students, finally addressing institutional strategy and support issues.
    • 1, 2, 3 – A journey of PDP at the University of Wolverhampton

      Lawton, Megan; Purnell, Emma (Aldinhe, 2010-11)
      This paper is a synthesis of the findings of three research projects to identify Personal Development Planning (PDP) progress at the University of Wolverhampton. The three projects look at PDP from a number of perspectives. Firstly, a university-wide e-Portfolio evaluation that explored e-Portfolio practice through the measure of PDP objectives evident in practice - the objectives used within this provide the structure for the discussion within this paper. Secondly, the paper is informed by the Inter/National Coalition for EPortfolio Research INCEPR) project, which involved looking at the facilitating and inhibiting factors affecting the scalability and sustainability of e-Portfolio and e-Portfolio based PDP across the institution. Finally, a Doctoral research project that looked at factors that contribute to engagement with PDP. Aspects of three of these pieces of research were pulled together as part of the Higher Education Academy/National Teaching Fellowship Scheme National Action Research Network On Researching and Evaluating Personal Development Planning and ePortfolio Practice Project (The NTFS NARN project).
    • The value of capture: Taking an alternative approach to using lecture capture technologies for increased impact on student learning and engagement

      Witton, Gemma (John Wiley & Sons, 2016-05-19)
      Lecture Capture technologies are becoming widespread in UK Higher Education with many institutions adopting a capture-all approach. Installations of capture devices in all teaching rooms and lecture theatres, scheduled recordings through integration with timetabling and automated distribution through virtual learning environments are swiftly becoming the norm. Capturing lectures has been shown to have a positive impact on student satisfaction, but numerous studies have shown little or no positive impact on student attainment as a result of capturing lectures. This article explores an alternative approach to the use of capture technologies in a pilot study at the University of Wolverhampton. The output of the pilot evaluation is a theoretical model recommending a shift in focus away from the conventional use of the technology for capturing lectures. It advocates a move toward the purposeful use of capture technologies to create content which adds value to student learning and increases engagement, which may ultimately lead to a positive impact on student attainment. The findings have implications for policy and practice around the use of capture technologies. Future work is described in the context of the project findings.
    • Using Facebook Pages to reach users: the experiences of University of Wolverhampton

      Alcock, Joanne (Association of Libraries and Information Professionals in the Social Sciences, 2009)
      This article shares the experiences of University of Wolverhampton's pilot project into the use of Facebook pages for academic libraries.
    • To investigate and then develop an ICT innovation to support students who are dyslexic when applying for Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA), thus enabling them to be more independent

      Norton, Liz (University of Wolverhampton, 2007)
      This project is in response to research carried out in 2007 with students who are dyslexic. This research investigated the barriers experienced by students in higher education who are dyslexic when accessing the Disabled Students’ Allowance. Reference is made to their comments throughout the text. The research identified one of the areas that they find difficult. This was the form they need to use to apply for the Disabled Students’ Allowance. The innovation has been designed to support this difficulty. An important thread running through the whole of this project is to help the student who is dyslexic to be in control, to feel valued and so to improve confidence and self-esteem.
    • Embedding information skills on student learning: providing the models

      Bastable, Wendy; Morris, Pamela (University of Wolverhampton, 2007)
      This Phase 3 (evaluation and embedding) project has been developed from a highly successful earlier project: Embedding information skills on student learning: making the difference (2006). The earlier project produced a programme of information literacy skills, based on SCONUL’s Seven Pillars of Wisdom, which was delivered to two modules of first year students from the School of Humanities, Languages and Social Sciences (HLSS) in bite-sized presentations at the end of their lectures. Importantly, it found that: “an effective Information Literacy programme delivered at the very beginning of Undergraduate life can contribute significantly to students’ ability to find, use and record information and increase their confidence regarding academic performance.” Bastable and Morris (2006). Valued by students, it clearly had a part to play in the learning experience of first year undergraduates and potentially in Schools’ retention and employability strategies. This was the impetus for a Phase 3 project which would test the information literacy programme on a more diverse range of students and subjects within HLSS and provide models which would encourage further take-up within the School and other Schools in the University. Other important outcomes from the previous project also needed to be carried forward and tested in a wider context: “We as librarians have been able to assess our approaches to the design and delivery of a structured Information Literacy programme. We have had the opportunity to work collaboratively as a team of librarians with academic staff and, crucial to the embedding process, earn important space on first semester, first year modules. We now know that the bite-sized sessions of information skills which are dove-tailed into existing lectures are a successful way to deliver the programme.” Bastable and Morris (2006). It was this combination of the following three features in Phase 2 which distinguished it from any other work being conducted in the field of information literacy: the partnership between academics and librarians, a structured information literacy programme and delivery in bite-sized sessions. So, it was these three crucial areas which would be put to the test in this current project by the delivery to an extended range of students.
    • Dyslexia: a holistic review of the strengths and difficulties

      Amesbury, Liz (University of Wolverhampton, 2007)
      The field of dyslexia has often been subject to controversy and contradictions, whether this has been through media reports of reported cures or through the ongoing debate about whether dyslexia exists. This paper will explore the evidence for co-ocurring syndromes to demonstrate how dyslexia can be seen as part of a wider spectrum of specific learning difficulties. The social model of dyslexia will also be examined, which emphasises the role of society in limiting those with specific learning difficulties as well as recognising the talents and strengths that are often present. The possibility of unifying these theories to provide a coherent understanding of specific learning difficulties will also be explored.
    • Embedding information skills training on student learning: making a difference

      Bastable, Wendy; Morris, Pamela; Cook, Eleanor; Dutton, Gill; Pieterick, Jackie; Taylor, Fiona (University of Wolverhampton, 2006)
      This embedding project builds on one that was delivered in 2001, headed by Oliver Pritchard, Dudley Learning Centre Manager, leading a research team with staff working from different Learning Centres in the University. In the 2001 project, sessions on information skills were run in three differing subject areas for second and third years and their impact on student learning was assessed using questionnaires and focus groups for students and in-depth interviews with academic staff. Findings were encouraging. Skills and experience gained within the sessions were taken on and applied within assignment work to good effect. Within this small study there is evidence of a progression in student awareness, confidence and skills and Information Skills sessions bring a longer-term, practical and tangible element to the learning experience and are a valuable part of helping students to become more effective learners.