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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Rob
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Matt
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-12T14:25:12Z
dc.date.available2014-11-12T14:25:12Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationNew Public Management in an age of austerity: knowledge and experience in further education 2013, 45 (3):244 Journal of Educational Administration and History
dc.identifier.issn0022-0620
dc.identifier.issn1478-7431
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00220620.2013.796913
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/334764
dc.description.abstractThis article originates in a piece of educational research into the experiences of further education (FE) student teachers in the West Midlands region of England. This cohort of students experienced significant upheaval in their college workplaces and placements during the 2010/2011 academic year. Pressures on FE funding were exacerbated by a Comprehensive Spending Review by the coalition government in late 2010 – prompted by the on-going global economic crisis. Some of the repercussions of these funding cuts for staff and students in the sector are discussed in this article, as perceived by this cohort of student teachers working in a range of FE providers across the West Midlands. Many of these repercussions can broadly be seen as an extension of existing managerialist practices, as the justification for an increasing squeeze on local resource allocation continues to be a wider appeal to global market ‘realities’. But we theorise that new public management (NPM) plays an important role in a reductive kind of knowledge production for policy-makers which fuels and legitimises on-going policy intervention, and we see this as an important shaping force in the emerging professional identity of these new teachers
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00220620.2013.796913
dc.subjectprofessionalism
dc.subjectmanagerialist positivism
dc.subjectFE policy
dc.titleNew Public Management in an age of austerity: knowledge and experience in further education
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Educational Administration and History
html.description.abstractThis article originates in a piece of educational research into the experiences of further education (FE) student teachers in the West Midlands region of England. This cohort of students experienced significant upheaval in their college workplaces and placements during the 2010/2011 academic year. Pressures on FE funding were exacerbated by a Comprehensive Spending Review by the coalition government in late 2010 – prompted by the on-going global economic crisis. Some of the repercussions of these funding cuts for staff and students in the sector are discussed in this article, as perceived by this cohort of student teachers working in a range of FE providers across the West Midlands. Many of these repercussions can broadly be seen as an extension of existing managerialist practices, as the justification for an increasing squeeze on local resource allocation continues to be a wider appeal to global market ‘realities’. But we theorise that new public management (NPM) plays an important role in a reductive kind of knowledge production for policy-makers which fuels and legitimises on-going policy intervention, and we see this as an important shaping force in the emerging professional identity of these new teachers


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