Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLahart, I. M.
dc.contributor.authorReichl, C.
dc.contributor.authorMetsios, G. S.
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.
dc.contributor.authorCarmichael, A. R.
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-29T14:13:06Z
dc.date.available2014-07-29T14:13:06Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-10
dc.identifier.citationLahart, IM., Reichl, C., Metsios, GS., Nevill, AM., Carmichael, A. 'Physical activity and awareness in breast screening attendees in Black Country, UK', Health Promotion International, 31 (1) pp. 13-22
dc.identifier.issn0957-4824
dc.identifier.issn1460-2245
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/heapro/dau053
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/323931
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to determine the physical activity levels and awareness of the influence of physical activity and overweight/obesity on breast cancer risk among NHS breast screening programme (NHSBSP) attendees. One hundred and eighty-eight (white British = 95%; post-menopausal = 80%) attendees completed a demographic and anthropometric data questionnaire, International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and awareness of breast cancer risk factors questionnaire. IPAQ data were reported as continuous measures (MET-min·week−1) and as categorical variables (low, moderate and high activities). The highest median physical activity levels were reported in the domestic physical activity domain (756 MET-min·week−1). Most participants were categorized as ‘moderately active’ (45%), while 30% were classified in the ‘high activity’ and 25% as ‘low activity’ categories. Almost a third of participants (30%) reported no leisure-time physical activity and 83% reported no vigorous physical activity. There was high awareness of the effects of physical activity (75%) and obesity (80%) on breast cancer risk. No significant differences were found between physical activity categories and awareness that physical activity can reduce breast cancer risk (p > 0.05). However, compared with moderate and high activity categories, participants in the ‘low activity’ category were significantly more likely to respond that they thought they achieved recommended physical activity levels (p < 0.05). Participants who are unaware of their inadequate physical activity levels may have a less positive intention to increase physical activity levels. Practical strategies aimed to increase knowledge of the recommended physical activity guidelines and facilitate the achievement of these guidelines may be required for NHSBSP attendees.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.heapro.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/heapro/dau053
dc.subjectbreast screening
dc.subjectphysical activities
dc.subjectobesity
dc.titlePhysical activity and awareness in breast screening attendees in Black Country, UK
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalHealth Promotion International
dc.source.volume31
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage13
dc.source.endpage22
html.description.abstractThis study aimed to determine the physical activity levels and awareness of the influence of physical activity and overweight/obesity on breast cancer risk among NHS breast screening programme (NHSBSP) attendees. One hundred and eighty-eight (white British = 95%; post-menopausal = 80%) attendees completed a demographic and anthropometric data questionnaire, International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and awareness of breast cancer risk factors questionnaire. IPAQ data were reported as continuous measures (MET-min·week−1) and as categorical variables (low, moderate and high activities). The highest median physical activity levels were reported in the domestic physical activity domain (756 MET-min·week−1). Most participants were categorized as ‘moderately active’ (45%), while 30% were classified in the ‘high activity’ and 25% as ‘low activity’ categories. Almost a third of participants (30%) reported no leisure-time physical activity and 83% reported no vigorous physical activity. There was high awareness of the effects of physical activity (75%) and obesity (80%) on breast cancer risk. No significant differences were found between physical activity categories and awareness that physical activity can reduce breast cancer risk (p > 0.05). However, compared with moderate and high activity categories, participants in the ‘low activity’ category were significantly more likely to respond that they thought they achieved recommended physical activity levels (p < 0.05). Participants who are unaware of their inadequate physical activity levels may have a less positive intention to increase physical activity levels. Practical strategies aimed to increase knowledge of the recommended physical activity guidelines and facilitate the achievement of these guidelines may be required for NHSBSP attendees.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record