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dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.
dc.contributor.authorWhyte, Gregory P.
dc.contributor.authorHolder, Roger L.
dc.contributor.authorPeyrebrune, M.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-25T13:11:14Z
dc.date.available2008-06-25T13:11:14Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Sports Medicine, 28 (12): 1012-1017
dc.identifier.issn0172-4622
dc.identifier.pmid17534781
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/s-2007-965088
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/30457
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this article was to investigate whether swimming world records are beginning to plateau and whether the inequality between men and women's swimming performances is narrowing, similar to that observed in running world records. A flattened "S-shaped curve" logistic curve is fitted to 100-m, 200-m, and 400-m front-crawl world-record swimming speeds for men and women from 1 May 1957 to the present time, using the non-linear least-squares regression. The inequality between men and women's world records is also assessed using the ratio, Women's/Men's world record speeds. The results confirm that men and women's front-crawl swimming world-record speeds are plateauing and the ratio between women's and men's world records has remained stable at approximately 0.9. In conclusion, the logistic curves provide evidence that swimming world-record speeds experienced a period of "accelerated" growth/improvements during the 1960 - 1970s, but are now beginning to plateau. The period of acceleration corresponded with numerous advances in science and technology but also coincided with the anecdotal evidence for institutionalised doping. Also noteworthy, however, is the remarkably consistency in the women's/men's world record ratio, circa 0.9, similar to those observed in middle and long distance running performances. These finding supports the notion that a 10 % gender inequality exists for both swimming and running.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherGeorg Thieme Verlag
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2007-965088
dc.subjectFemale athletes
dc.subjectCompetitive Behaviour
dc.subjectLogistic curve
dc.subjectNon‐linear regression
dc.subjectWorld record swimming speeds
dc.subjectPerformance ratio
dc.subjectPeriod of acceleration
dc.subject.meshCompetitive Behavior
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshPhysical Endurance
dc.subject.meshSwimming
dc.titleAre there limits to swimming world records?
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Medicine
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this article was to investigate whether swimming world records are beginning to plateau and whether the inequality between men and women's swimming performances is narrowing, similar to that observed in running world records. A flattened "S-shaped curve" logistic curve is fitted to 100-m, 200-m, and 400-m front-crawl world-record swimming speeds for men and women from 1 May 1957 to the present time, using the non-linear least-squares regression. The inequality between men and women's world records is also assessed using the ratio, Women's/Men's world record speeds. The results confirm that men and women's front-crawl swimming world-record speeds are plateauing and the ratio between women's and men's world records has remained stable at approximately 0.9. In conclusion, the logistic curves provide evidence that swimming world-record speeds experienced a period of "accelerated" growth/improvements during the 1960 - 1970s, but are now beginning to plateau. The period of acceleration corresponded with numerous advances in science and technology but also coincided with the anecdotal evidence for institutionalised doping. Also noteworthy, however, is the remarkably consistency in the women's/men's world record ratio, circa 0.9, similar to those observed in middle and long distance running performances. These finding supports the notion that a 10 % gender inequality exists for both swimming and running.


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