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dc.contributor.authorBull, H.
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Paul G.
dc.contributor.authorThomas, David G.
dc.contributor.authorFraser, A. M.
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Paul N.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-20T10:26:38Z
dc.date.available2008-06-20T10:26:38Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationMolecular Pathology, 55(2): 65-72
dc.identifier.issn1366-8714
dc.identifier.pmid11950951
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/30253
dc.description.abstractAcid phosphatases (APs) are a family of enzymes that are widespread in nature, and can be found in many animal and plant species. Mystery surrounds the precise functional role of these molecular facilitators, despite much research. Yet, paradoxically, human APs have had considerable impact as tools of clinical investigation and intervention. One particular example is tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, which is detected in the serum in raised amounts accompanying pathological bone resorption. This article seeks to explore the identity and diversity of APs, and to demonstrate the relation between APs, human disease, and clinical diagnosis.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group Ltd.
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1187150&rendertype=abstract
dc.subjectTartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase
dc.subjectEnzymes
dc.subject.meshAcid Phosphatase
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers
dc.subject.meshBone Resorption
dc.subject.meshFavism
dc.subject.meshGaucher Disease
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIntracellular Fluid
dc.subject.meshIsoenzymes
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Hairy Cell
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshOsteoclasts
dc.subject.meshOsteoporosis
dc.subject.meshProstate
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshProtein Binding
dc.subject.meshReactive Oxygen Species
dc.subject.meshAlpha-Macroglobulins
dc.titleAcid phosphatases.
dc.title.alternativeDemystified - Acid Phosphatases
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalMolecular Pathology
html.description.abstractAcid phosphatases (APs) are a family of enzymes that are widespread in nature, and can be found in many animal and plant species. Mystery surrounds the precise functional role of these molecular facilitators, despite much research. Yet, paradoxically, human APs have had considerable impact as tools of clinical investigation and intervention. One particular example is tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, which is detected in the serum in raised amounts accompanying pathological bone resorption. This article seeks to explore the identity and diversity of APs, and to demonstrate the relation between APs, human disease, and clinical diagnosis.


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