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dc.contributor.authorCollins, Tim
dc.contributor.authorGoto, R.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-19T14:29:19Z
dc.date.available2008-06-19T14:29:19Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationIn: Hall, T. and Miles, M. (ed.) Urban Futures. London: Routledge, pp. 134-144.
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-415-26693-2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/30201
dc.descriptionUrban Futures brings together commentaries from a wide range of contemporary disciplines and fields relevant to urban culture, form and society. The book concerns cities in the broadest sense, not just as buildings and spaces, but also as processes and events or sites of occupation, in which meanings are constructed in many ways. The contributors draw on their specialist areas of research to inform current debate, but they also speculate as to how cities will be shaped in the 21st century. (Routledge)
dc.description.abstractThe chapter expands the understanding of what urban means in relationship to nature and ecology, by examining a broad range of interdisciplinary thinkers. The collaborators explore the idea of “radical ecologies,” new ideas in the philosophy of the environment that can inform the work of artists interested in cities and the environment. The text provides a brief history of land preservation and conservation and the move toward land and ecosystems restoration. This is juxtaposed against the artists move into the landscape in sculpture and then toward ecosystems and more recently environmental planning. The juxtaposition leads to a synthesis resulting in a set of goals and objectives for a new integration of art in relationship to social and ecological issues. Researched by Collins, then discussed, jointly written and edited with a collaborator of twenty years. The chapter constructs a narrative of applied ecologies, cultural ecologies and emergent ideas in art and radical (socially transformative) approaches to ecology. The text examines the potential for emergent ideas in an ‘ecology of health’ to reconfigure dominant paradigmatic understandings of humanity and nature in aesthetic, social, political and legal terms. The role of art in this project is to be an intellectually catalytic force that works across disciplines and foundations of knowledge.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis)
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.routledge.com/Urban-Futures-Critical-Commentaries-on-shaping-Cities-1st-Edition/Hall-Miles/p/book/9780415266949
dc.titleLandscape, Ecology, Art and Change
dc.title.alternativeUrban Futures
dc.typeChapter in book
html.description.abstractThe chapter expands the understanding of what urban means in relationship to nature and ecology, by examining a broad range of interdisciplinary thinkers. The collaborators explore the idea of “radical ecologies,” new ideas in the philosophy of the environment that can inform the work of artists interested in cities and the environment. The text provides a brief history of land preservation and conservation and the move toward land and ecosystems restoration. This is juxtaposed against the artists move into the landscape in sculpture and then toward ecosystems and more recently environmental planning. The juxtaposition leads to a synthesis resulting in a set of goals and objectives for a new integration of art in relationship to social and ecological issues. Researched by Collins, then discussed, jointly written and edited with a collaborator of twenty years. The chapter constructs a narrative of applied ecologies, cultural ecologies and emergent ideas in art and radical (socially transformative) approaches to ecology. The text examines the potential for emergent ideas in an ‘ecology of health’ to reconfigure dominant paradigmatic understandings of humanity and nature in aesthetic, social, political and legal terms. The role of art in this project is to be an intellectually catalytic force that works across disciplines and foundations of knowledge.


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