Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMoran, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-11T13:02:57Z
dc.date.available2008-06-11T13:02:57Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationCrime Law and Social Change, 44(4-5): 335-359
dc.identifier.issn0925-4994
dc.identifier.issn1573-0751
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10611-006-9026-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29894
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyses the patterns and extent of state power in the war on terror. The paper argues that the War on Terror has seen important extensions in state power, which pose challenges not only for globalisation theorists and advocates of international law, but also theorists of the managerial or limited state, or those who see the state as over-determined in various ways by societal mechanisms or actors. Recent analyses, prompted by events in the War on Terror, have begun to focus on the extent of state power, rather than its perceived fundamental limits in late modern society. This reflects a need to analyse the politics and processes of national security. Having made this point, extensions in state power must be viewed in context and dynamically with regard to their effect on civil liberties, necessary to avoid a 'flattened' a-historical approach to state power and civil society. The problem of state power will be examined with regard to the UK and USA. The UK and the USA represent different constitutional arrangements, jurisdictions, legal and administrative intelligence and law enforcement powers, systems of accountability and political cultures. However as late modern liberal democracies they also display remarkable similarities and stand as illuminating examples to contrast structural patterns of state power, politics and civil society. They have also been identified as representing the evolution of the limited late modern state.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10611-006-9026-4
dc.subjectCivil liberties
dc.subjectTerrorism
dc.subjectUK
dc.subjectUSA
dc.subjectCounter-terrorism
dc.subjectInternational law
dc.subjectState power
dc.subjectNational security
dc.subjectGovernment policy
dc.subjectGlobalisation
dc.subjectWar studies
dc.titleState Power and the War on Terror: A Comparative Analysis of the USA and UK
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalCrime Law and Social Change
html.description.abstractThis paper analyses the patterns and extent of state power in the war on terror. The paper argues that the War on Terror has seen important extensions in state power, which pose challenges not only for globalisation theorists and advocates of international law, but also theorists of the managerial or limited state, or those who see the state as over-determined in various ways by societal mechanisms or actors. Recent analyses, prompted by events in the War on Terror, have begun to focus on the extent of state power, rather than its perceived fundamental limits in late modern society. This reflects a need to analyse the politics and processes of national security. Having made this point, extensions in state power must be viewed in context and dynamically with regard to their effect on civil liberties, necessary to avoid a 'flattened' a-historical approach to state power and civil society. The problem of state power will be examined with regard to the UK and USA. The UK and the USA represent different constitutional arrangements, jurisdictions, legal and administrative intelligence and law enforcement powers, systems of accountability and political cultures. However as late modern liberal democracies they also display remarkable similarities and stand as illuminating examples to contrast structural patterns of state power, politics and civil society. They have also been identified as representing the evolution of the limited late modern state.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record