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dc.contributor.authorYoung, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorJarvis, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-09T13:05:39Z
dc.date.available2008-06-09T13:05:39Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationLandscape Ecology, 16(7): 643-658
dc.identifier.issn09212973
dc.identifier.issn15729761
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1013108005347
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29713
dc.description.abstractThe processes of urbanisation have left a fragmented mosaic of habitat patches of varying size, shape and character with the result that from location to location the number and quality of contacts between patches varies considerably. Traditional measurements of this habitat fragmentation, and its converse, connectivity, have rarely looked at the landscape as a whole but instead have simplified it to specific landscape subsets, or else have looked at area-to-area relationships through generalising the landscape into homogeneous pixels or grids. In this paper the character of the whole landscape is examined at scales appropriate to the spatial variability of the urban environment. Using a direct measurement of patch-to-patch contact all contacts between all patches are examined and the relationship between all contiguous and connecting habitats is quantified. This is further refined to look at connections between patches of different quality, a measure that highlights the adverse effects of urbanisation as a whole on landscape connections between quality habitats. (SpringerLink)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1013108005347
dc.relation.url
dc.subjectWest Midlands
dc.subjectHabitat quality
dc.subjectUrban habitats
dc.subjectLand use
dc.subjectUrban green space
dc.subjectLandscape ecology
dc.subjectHabitat fragmentation
dc.subjectHabitat change
dc.subjectConnectivity and contiguity
dc.subjectConservation
dc.titleMeasuring urban habitat fragmentation: an example from the Black Country, UK
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalLandscape Ecology
html.description.abstractThe processes of urbanisation have left a fragmented mosaic of habitat patches of varying size, shape and character with the result that from location to location the number and quality of contacts between patches varies considerably. Traditional measurements of this habitat fragmentation, and its converse, connectivity, have rarely looked at the landscape as a whole but instead have simplified it to specific landscape subsets, or else have looked at area-to-area relationships through generalising the landscape into homogeneous pixels or grids. In this paper the character of the whole landscape is examined at scales appropriate to the spatial variability of the urban environment. Using a direct measurement of patch-to-patch contact all contacts between all patches are examined and the relationship between all contiguous and connecting habitats is quantified. This is further refined to look at connections between patches of different quality, a measure that highlights the adverse effects of urbanisation as a whole on landscape connections between quality habitats. (SpringerLink)


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