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dc.contributor.authorStanford, Mark
dc.contributor.authorLister, Paul M.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-06T15:27:14Z
dc.date.available2008-06-06T15:27:14Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationIndustrial Lubrication and Tribology, 54(1): 11-19
dc.identifier.issn00368792
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/00368790210415329
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29638
dc.descriptionThe case for establishing viable methods of reducing cutting fluid consumption, through their replacement by gaseous coolants is presented. This paper formed the basis of significant research presented in Stanford’s other outputs. The industrial interest that evolved during the work is driven by many factors including environmental considerations: fluid disposal can result in the accumulation of dissolved nitrogen compounds causing eutrophication of ground and surface water; incineration forms nitrogen oxides and carcinogens in the form of dioxins; and cost, in that the use and disposal of cutting fluids forms 17% of the cost of cutting operations.
dc.description.abstractAs more stringent environmental legislation is enforced throughout Europe manufacturing businesses, employing metal cutting processes, can no longer ignore the growing importance of environmental aspects relating to cutting fluids. Businesses, through market forces, are being forced into offering a “clean solution” to the metal cutting processes which they operate. Cutting fluids despite playing an important role in metal cutting, have considerable environmental impact. There is a need therefore to understand the role of cutting fluids within the cutting process in order to evaluate possible environmentally friendly alternatives to the use of cutting fluids. In order to achieve this the operating environment in which the process is being carried out, and the consequences of removing the cutting fluid from the process altogether has to be assessed. This paper therefore, reflects on the role of cutting fluid and the implications of their use. Viable methods of reducing cutting fluid consumption are also reported, together with efficient methods of cutting fluid utilisation (e.g. minimum quantity delivery systems). Finally, the difficulties experienced in removing cutting fluids from the metal cutting process are highlighted through the consideration of dry cutting technologies. (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd.
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1453994
dc.subjectCutting fluids
dc.subjectMetal cutting
dc.subjectEnvironmental pollution
dc.subjectCoolants
dc.subjectEngineering technology
dc.subjectFluid dynamics
dc.subjectMaterial removal processes
dc.subjectInert gas
dc.titleThe Future Role of Metalworking Fluids in Metal Cutting Operations
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalIndustrial Lubrication and Tribology
html.description.abstractAs more stringent environmental legislation is enforced throughout Europe manufacturing businesses, employing metal cutting processes, can no longer ignore the growing importance of environmental aspects relating to cutting fluids. Businesses, through market forces, are being forced into offering a “clean solution” to the metal cutting processes which they operate. Cutting fluids despite playing an important role in metal cutting, have considerable environmental impact. There is a need therefore to understand the role of cutting fluids within the cutting process in order to evaluate possible environmentally friendly alternatives to the use of cutting fluids. In order to achieve this the operating environment in which the process is being carried out, and the consequences of removing the cutting fluid from the process altogether has to be assessed. This paper therefore, reflects on the role of cutting fluid and the implications of their use. Viable methods of reducing cutting fluid consumption are also reported, together with efficient methods of cutting fluid utilisation (e.g. minimum quantity delivery systems). Finally, the difficulties experienced in removing cutting fluids from the metal cutting process are highlighted through the consideration of dry cutting technologies. (Emerald Group Publishing Limited)


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