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dc.contributor.authorWyon, Matthew A.
dc.contributor.authorDeighan, Martine A.
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.
dc.contributor.authorDoherty, Michael
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Sharon L.
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Nick
dc.contributor.authorJobson, Simon A.
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Simon R.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-04T13:48:45Z
dc.date.available2008-06-04T13:48:45Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 21 (2): 389-393
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011
dc.identifier.pmid17530956
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29515
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the cardiorespiratory and anthropometric indices of professional classical ballet dancers in relation to company seniority, gender, and supplemental training. Forty-nine participants from an international touring company carried out a peak Vo(2) test and vertical jump test. Anthropometric measurements and supplemental training activities were also recorded for each participant. Statistical analyses showed significant differences between gender and dancer seniority levels. Gender differences were seen for jump height (M = 52.7 +/- 7.12 cm; F = 37.6 +/- 5.32 cm) and peak Vo(2) (M = 49.32 +/- 3.72 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); F = 43.3 +/- 5.16 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)). Differences were also seen between dancer levels for peak Vo(2) (artist = 46.47 +/- 4.67 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); first artist = 42.72 +/- 5.81 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); soloist = 43.38 +/- 7.14 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); principal = 49.04 +/- 3.63 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)) and jump height (artist = 42.0 +/- 9.11 cm; first artist = 50.33 +/- 11.65 cm; soloist = 45.6 +/- 9.78 cm; principal = 44.67 +/- 9.53 cm). Pairwise post hoc comparisons showed that corps and principals had significantly greater relative peak Vo(2) than first artists and soloists (p < 0.05), while soloists and first artists had significantly greater jump heights compared to principals and corps (p < 0.05). Analysis of covariance modeling indicated that the self-reported mode of supplemental training had no association with relative peak Vo(2) or the percentage at which ventilatory threshold occurred. The present study has provided further insight into the cardiorespiratory profiles of classical ballet dancers, where soloists have significantly greater power capacities compared to principals and corps, who in turn had significantly greater aerobic power. These data can help guide strength and conditioning intervention strategies that need to take into account the nuances of the different seniority levels within a dance company.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics Pub
dc.relation.urlhttp://apt.allenpress.com/perlserv/?request=get-abstract&doi=10.1519%2FR-19405.1
dc.subjectCardiorespiratory fitness
dc.subjectBallet
dc.subjectSports Medicine
dc.subjectAerobic capacity
dc.subjectAnaerobic Threshold
dc.subjectModelling
dc.subjectPower output
dc.subjectDance
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance
dc.subject.meshAnthropometry
dc.subject.meshDancing
dc.subject.meshExercise Test
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMovement
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumption
dc.subject.meshSex Factors
dc.subject.meshSomatotypes
dc.titleThe cardiorespiratory, anthropometric, and performance characteristics of an international/national touring ballet company.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
html.description.abstractThis study examined the cardiorespiratory and anthropometric indices of professional classical ballet dancers in relation to company seniority, gender, and supplemental training. Forty-nine participants from an international touring company carried out a peak Vo(2) test and vertical jump test. Anthropometric measurements and supplemental training activities were also recorded for each participant. Statistical analyses showed significant differences between gender and dancer seniority levels. Gender differences were seen for jump height (M = 52.7 +/- 7.12 cm; F = 37.6 +/- 5.32 cm) and peak Vo(2) (M = 49.32 +/- 3.72 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); F = 43.3 +/- 5.16 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)). Differences were also seen between dancer levels for peak Vo(2) (artist = 46.47 +/- 4.67 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); first artist = 42.72 +/- 5.81 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); soloist = 43.38 +/- 7.14 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); principal = 49.04 +/- 3.63 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)) and jump height (artist = 42.0 +/- 9.11 cm; first artist = 50.33 +/- 11.65 cm; soloist = 45.6 +/- 9.78 cm; principal = 44.67 +/- 9.53 cm). Pairwise post hoc comparisons showed that corps and principals had significantly greater relative peak Vo(2) than first artists and soloists (p < 0.05), while soloists and first artists had significantly greater jump heights compared to principals and corps (p < 0.05). Analysis of covariance modeling indicated that the self-reported mode of supplemental training had no association with relative peak Vo(2) or the percentage at which ventilatory threshold occurred. The present study has provided further insight into the cardiorespiratory profiles of classical ballet dancers, where soloists have significantly greater power capacities compared to principals and corps, who in turn had significantly greater aerobic power. These data can help guide strength and conditioning intervention strategies that need to take into account the nuances of the different seniority levels within a dance company.


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