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dc.contributor.authorConway, C.A.
dc.contributor.authorJones, B.C.
dc.contributor.authorDeBruine, L.M.
dc.contributor.authorWelling, L.L.M.
dc.contributor.authorLaw Smith, M.J.
dc.contributor.authorPerrett, D.I.
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Martin A.
dc.contributor.authorAl-Dujaili, E.A.S.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-04T11:51:39Z
dc.date.available2008-06-04T11:51:39Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationHormones and Behavior, 51(2): 202-206
dc.identifier.issn0018-506X
dc.identifier.pmid17150220
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.yhbeh.2006.10.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29500
dc.description.abstractFindings from previous studies of hormone-mediated behavior in women suggest that raised progesterone level increases the probability of behaviors that will reduce the likelihood of disruption to fetal development during pregnancy (e.g. increased avoidance of sources of contagion). Here, we tested women's (N=52) sensitivity to potential cues to nearby sources of contagion (disgusted facial expressions with averted gaze) and nearby physical threat (fearful facial expressions with averted gaze) at two points in the menstrual cycle differing in progesterone level. Women demonstrated a greater tendency to perceive fearful and disgusted expressions with averted gaze as more intense than those with direct gaze when their progesterone level was relatively high. By contrast, change in progesterone level was not associated with any change in perceptions of happy expressions with direct and averted gaze, indicating that our findings for disgusted and fearful expressions were not due to a general response bias. Collectively, our findings suggest women are more sensitive to facial cues signalling nearby contagion and physical threat when raised progesterone level prepares the body for pregnancy.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier Science Direct
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6WGC-4MH2C47-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=5cfcd6f046add7a8045936dfe611abe2
dc.subjectThreat
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance
dc.subject.meshCues
dc.subject.meshEmotions
dc.subject.meshFacial Expression
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMenstrual Cycle
dc.subject.meshNonverbal Communication
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visual
dc.subject.meshPersuasive Communication
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulation
dc.subject.meshProgesterone
dc.subject.meshReference Values
dc.subject.meshSaliva
dc.subject.meshVisual Perception
dc.titleSalience of emotional displays of danger and contagion in faces is enhanced when progesterone levels are raised.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalHormones and Behavior
html.description.abstractFindings from previous studies of hormone-mediated behavior in women suggest that raised progesterone level increases the probability of behaviors that will reduce the likelihood of disruption to fetal development during pregnancy (e.g. increased avoidance of sources of contagion). Here, we tested women's (N=52) sensitivity to potential cues to nearby sources of contagion (disgusted facial expressions with averted gaze) and nearby physical threat (fearful facial expressions with averted gaze) at two points in the menstrual cycle differing in progesterone level. Women demonstrated a greater tendency to perceive fearful and disgusted expressions with averted gaze as more intense than those with direct gaze when their progesterone level was relatively high. By contrast, change in progesterone level was not associated with any change in perceptions of happy expressions with direct and averted gaze, indicating that our findings for disgusted and fearful expressions were not due to a general response bias. Collectively, our findings suggest women are more sensitive to facial cues signalling nearby contagion and physical threat when raised progesterone level prepares the body for pregnancy.


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