• Ethos and Politics in the Youth Hostels Association (YHA) in the 1930s

      Cunningham, Michael (Routledge, 2016-02-16)
      The Youth Hostels Association (YHA) was a formally non-political organization founded to provide cheap accommodation for walkers and cyclists. However, the YHA drew on, and was influenced by, values and ideas which both attracted a particular kind of member and informed its domestic political interventions. The article specifically examines the connections between the YHA and other organizations, aspects of the politics of membership relating to the concepts of respectability and class and the political interventions of the YHA in the areas of unemployment and the access movement.
    • 'Pavements grey of the imprisoning city': the articulation of a pro-rural and anti-urban ideology in the youth hostels association in the 1930s

      Cunningham, M. (SAGE Publications Ltd, 2016-05-06)
      The YHA was a self-professed non-political organisation that promoted the provision of cheap accommodation for walkers and cyclists. Despite this non-political stance, the literature of the YHA in the 1930s reveals a consistent pro-rural and anti-urban ideology. This article examines the articulation of this ideology and locates it both within a longer tradition of such sentiments in England and also within the social and cultural concerns of the decade.
    • “Two wheels bad”? : the status of cycling in the Youth Hostels Association of England and Wales in the 1930s

      Cunningham, Michael (Berghahn, 2018-06-01)
      The Youth Hostels Association (YHA) was founded to provide cheap accommodation for rural holidays. It catered for both walkers and cyclists. However, many perceived the organisation as one that favoured walkers, considering walking to be a superior form of travel which was also reflected in YHA policy. Despite this, the YHA had close institutional links with cycling organisations and many cyclists among its members. This article traces the YHA’s relationship with walkers and cyclists and, despite occasional tensions, shows that the two groups could be accommodated within the organisation