• Black Britain in the weekly music press during the late-1960s and 1970s

      Glen, Patrick (Taylor & Francis, 2021-12-31)
      Music is a means of communicating and sharing. Sounds and lyrics, even the most abstract or oblique, can document memories, impressions of the present and articulate desires for the future that listeners unpack and reinterpret imposing their own contexts, experiences and prior understandings. Recorded music provided a memory technology that allowed these ideas, sounds and cultures to be articulated, transmitted and interpreted more quickly and further than oral cultures previously allowed. A culture industry and mass media (newspapers, magazines, books television and radio) gave certain—profoundly shaped by capitalism, creating and perpetuating structures of power in society—recorded songs and musics the chance to be shared across and between countries and continents. Within the colonial and post-colonial context Britain after 1945, music made and performed by people who had arrived in Britain from colonies, created in dialogue with those who remained, and the reaction to it by their ‘hosts’, provided an impression of both new arrivals and British society. As Jon Stratton argues regarding Caribbean migration to Britain, ‘[music] offered sites for memory and identity, a refuge from the present and a source of opposition and to and commentary on the migrants’ circumstances. In the new situation cultural exchange with the dominant culture was inevitable.’
    • Denied a Future? The right to education of Roma/Gypsy and traveller children in Europe

      Pinnock, Katherine (London: Save the Children, 2001)
      The idea for the Denied a Future? report emerged at the 1999 session of the UN Commission on Human Rights. Save the Children decided that there was a need for a basic text that described legislation, policy and practice with regard to education provision for Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children in a number of European countries. Denied a Future? therefore describes law, policy and practice in the period June 2000 to June 2001. The report was intended to serve as a benchmark against which the impact of contemporaray and future investments by the World Bank, the European Union, national and local governments and other agencies could be assessed. The report, published online in 4 volumes, highlights the lack of access to good-quality education of Roma children across Europe. Across Europe the challenge of providing Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children with access to quality education is not being met. Many school systems continue to marginalise Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children, thereby effectively denying them the chance to reach their full potential. Denied a future? examines 14 countries across Europe. It highlights the impact that a lack of personal security and freedom of movement, poverty and powerlessness all have on access to education for Roma/Gypsy and Traveller children.
    • In Proportion

      Waddington, P. A. J.; Stenson, Kevin; Don, David (Oxford University Press, 2004)
      This article examines the view, expressed authoritatively in the Macpherson report (1999), that racial disproportionality in police stop and search is attributable to officers selectively targeting minority groups. The research on which this article is based replicates Home Office research (Miller and MVA 2000) that profiled the population ‘available’ in public places to be stopped and searched. Using a combination of data sources, this article extends that research in two directions: first, by exploring the issue of visibility and how it has an impact upon decisions to stop and search; and, secondly, by investigating whether disproportionality might arise indirectly from the way in which police direct their efforts in relation to time, place and types of motor vehicle. Finally, we discuss the implications of this research for the concept of ‘institutional racism’.
    • Racism, ‘second generation’ refugees and the asylum system

      Hirsch, Shirin; Department of History, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK (Taylor and Francis, 2017-08-30)
      This paper explores ‘second generation’ refugee experiences of racism in London, drawing on 45 qualitative interviews. The article analyses specific histories of racialisation for three different refugee groups from Vietnam, Sri Lanka and Turkey and the generational shifts in reproducing race. The asylum system is foregrounded as an essential framework in which to analyse experiences of racism. This was most evident for the first generation refugee, however for their children less is known on how these forms of racism shaped experiences. Within our study, ‘everyday’ mundane forms of racism were recounted by the ‘second generation’ which were often contrasted with that of their parents in severity. This paper analyses this inter-generational relationship further in relation to racism, through the lens of the asylum system. The paper therefore contributes to a greater empirical understanding on earlier modalities of racism and how they survive into the present.