• Black Britain in the weekly music press during the late-1960s and 1970s

      Glen, Patrick (Taylor & Francis, 2021-12-31)
      Music is a means of communicating and sharing. Sounds and lyrics, even the most abstract or oblique, can document memories, impressions of the present and articulate desires for the future that listeners unpack and reinterpret imposing their own contexts, experiences and prior understandings. Recorded music provided a memory technology that allowed these ideas, sounds and cultures to be articulated, transmitted and interpreted more quickly and further than oral cultures previously allowed. A culture industry and mass media (newspapers, magazines, books television and radio) gave certain—profoundly shaped by capitalism, creating and perpetuating structures of power in society—recorded songs and musics the chance to be shared across and between countries and continents. Within the colonial and post-colonial context Britain after 1945, music made and performed by people who had arrived in Britain from colonies, created in dialogue with those who remained, and the reaction to it by their ‘hosts’, provided an impression of both new arrivals and British society. As Jon Stratton argues regarding Caribbean migration to Britain, ‘[music] offered sites for memory and identity, a refuge from the present and a source of opposition and to and commentary on the migrants’ circumstances. In the new situation cultural exchange with the dominant culture was inevitable.’
    • Determinants of environmental sustainable behaviour amongst logging companies in Cameroon

      MBZIBAIN, AURELIAN (Academic Star Publishing Company, 2021-12-31)
      This paper presents the findings of an indepth qualitative study of the most important forest logging companies and syndicates to explore the factors which influence forest exploitation and related businesses in the Congo Basin of Africa to act or not in environmentally sustainable ways. More specifically, the study explored the motivations, the benefits and the factors which facilitate or constrain sustainable behaviour amongst forest exploitation companies in Cameroon. Data analysis was undertaken using a holistic model consisting of institutional, economic and resource based factors. Economic motivations were the most cited factors driven by increased awareness and demands from clients. Interestingly, the most cited benefit from adopting environmentally sustainable behaviour related to gains in internal organisation, transparency and productivity within the company. The regulatory institutional environment was the most cited constraint because of illegality, weak law enforcement and corruption in the country’s forest sector followed by high costs of investment and unclear financial premiums from environmentally sourced timber. The policy implications are discussed.
    • A qualitative study on the experiences and challenges of MBA students’ engagement with a business research methods module

      Nzekwe-Excel, Chinny (Emerald, 2021-12-31)
      Undertaking research as part of a business degree qualification undoubtedly enables students to develop practical and life-long skills. Nevertheless, students seem to find it challenging undertaking a research project. This study set out to explore the experiences of a group of MBA students who recently undertook their business and management research projects as part of their MBA degree program. The study was carried out in a UK Higher Education Institution and is based on an MBA Business and Management Research Module. The purpose of the module is to enable learners to develop advancedlevel independent research and critical problem-solving skills within a business context. The study adopted a qualitative approach to capture a broad mix of students’ experiences and perceptions on the Module. The sample includes previous MBA students on different cohorts, and different nationalities. Outcomes of the study show that though students are stretched in the business and management project process, they develop a diversity of skills required in the workplace while conducting their projects. The study findings also show that the practical implications of the students’ projects and progressive support from their Project Supervisors contribute to the successful completion of their projects and subsequent attainment of their MBA degree. Outcomes of this study further reveal that undertaking business and management projects creates a rewarding learning experience for learners/students, develops confident graduates, as well as enables effective applications of theory into practice.
    • Exposing gender bias in intellectual property law: the UK music industries

      Potocnik, Metka; Mtima, Lateef; Jamar, Steven D (Cambridge University Press, 2021-12-31)
    • Educating well: A keynote on a future paradigm for applied arts and health in education

      Prior, Ross; Fenton, Louise (Universitetsforlaget, 2021-12-31)
    • A deaf translation norm?

      Stone, Christopher; Bielsa, Esperança (Routledge, 2021-10-29)
    • Central bank digital currency: What is it and why now?

      Barnes, Matthew (Thomson Reuters, 2021-09-01)
      A central bank digital currency ( CBDC) is electronic in nature and one which amounts to the currency of the country implementing it. The value of a CBDC is the same as the physical form, i.e. a £10 CBDC would equate to a £10 bank note. It is not classed as a cryptocurrency, which is a form of digital currency, however, the Bank of England has said that it may use the distributed ledger technology ( DLT) which is utilised for cryptocurrency. Central banks are researching into the benefits and implications of a CBDC, such as making payments more resilient and faster, and adapting to the digital economy. Cynically, it appears that central banks are concerned by the potential of cryptocurrencies becoming mainstream and making central banks redundant. This article will explore the following: what is a CBDC, why is it being explored now and the future of money and payment services.
    • Changing the rules of the game in academic publishing: three scenarios in the field of management research

      Brabet, Julienne; Ozbilgin, Mustafa; Yamak, Sibel (Inderscience, 2021-09)
      The field of academic publishing is under multiple pressures to transform as it suffers from crises of confidence partly due to the mass marketisation, deterioration of relevance and decline of collaborative scientific ethos that it has experienced. The paper offers a provocation based on a multilevel analysis of the present academic (business) model of knowledge production and dissemination, and its consequences. It then presents three alternative futuristic scenarios. The first one is based on a fully commercialized approach to publishing. The second scenario promotes an open science approach and the third one explores a complete overhaul of our current approach to management research. The paper has implications for governance of the field of publishing in management research into the future and aims to alert the actors in the sector to the vices of the mass marketisation of academic publishing.
    • Environmental commitment and innovation as catalysts for export performance in family firms

      Haddoud, Mohamed Yacine; Onjewu, Adah-Kole Emmanuel; Nowiński, Witold (Elsevier, 2021-08-31)
      Recognizing the extent of inconclusive findings in the environmental commitment – export performance nexus, this study examines this link in order to reduce theoretical ambiguity. The paper focuses on family firms in Poland and assesses the distinct rate of export intensity resulting from strategic commitment to environmental issues, through product innovation and process innovation. Analyzing a sample of 409 firms sourced from the World Bank Enterprise Survey database, the results indicate that strategic commitment to environmental issues encourages process innovation but not product innovation. In turn, process innovation increases export intensity while product innovation does not. It is also found that quality certifications interact with the relationship between strategic commitment to environmental issues and product innovation. These findings pose important theoretical implications and offer insights to stakeholders particularly interested in the sustainable practices of family firms.
    • NGO-state relations in the monitoring of illegal forest logging and wildlife trafficking in Central Africa

      Mbzibain, Aurelian; Tchoudjen, Teodyl Nkuintchua (Elsevier, 2021-08-28)
      Independent forest monitoring (IFM) by Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) emerged in the late 1990s as a forest governance mechanism in response to rising forest crime in Asia and Central Africa. IFM is the use of an independent third party that, by agreement or not with state authorities, provides an assessment of legal compliance, and observation of and guidance on official forest law enforcement systems. The success of IFM by NGOs is therefore, inextricably linked to the nature of the relationship with state authorities yet this relationship has neither been explored nor understood. There is scant empirical research on this mechanism globally. This paper addresses these gaps through participatory observation, documentary analysis and interviews with leaders of five NGOs at the forefront of forest and wildlife monitoring in Central Africa. Using Najam (2000) 4-C framework, we find complex and fluid relationships ranging from cooperation, complementarity, confrontation and instrumentalization. Complementarity and confrontation emerge as the most important relationship types while cooperation is the least prevalent relationship. In response to challenges in the relationships, NGOs use a repertoire of strategies and tactics to influence the state in pursuit of their goals. Unfortunately, significant dependence on a limited stream of intermittent external donor funding and lack of clearly articulated influence and advocacy strategies, limit the potential contribution of IFM to the fight against forest and wildlife crime in Central Africa. The implications for IFM organisations, national governments and donor agencies are discussed.
    • Mediation and arbitration: An alternative forum for transnational dispute resolution in the music industries

      Potocnik, Metka; Harrison, Ann; Rigg, Tony (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2021-08-26)
    • Neutral is the new blind: calling for gender segregated evidence in UK legislative inquiries regarding the music industries

      Potocnik, Metka (Law Research Centre, University of Wolverhampton, 2021-08-16)
      In late 2020, the Government responded to the enormous crisis in the UK music industries, caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, by several legislative inquiries, aimed at reviewing the rules regulating the industry, including rules on commercialisation of intellectual property (IP). The aim of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) inquiries is purportedly to improve the fairness and viability of the sector, which was devastated by the pandemic. At the same time, the Covid-19 crisis served as a catalyst to expose the pre-existing inequalities and unfairness in the music industries. This article explores the path of the UK DCMS 2020-21 legislative inquiry into the Economics of Music Streaming as a case study to the current approach in UK regulation of the music industries. Informed by the feminist theory of relational legal feminism and embedded in the broader framework of IP Social Justice theory, the author argues that the current approach to legislative inquiries is incomplete, because it fails to take into account the systemic barriers faced by women (i.e. all who identify as women), including gender minority musicians in the sector. The evidence collected fails to investigate the lived experience of women, to the detriment of the fairness of the overall proposal of future reform.
    • Participatory co-design and normalisation process theory with staff and patients to implement digital ways of working into routine care: the example of electronic patient-reported outcomes in UK renal services

      Knowles, SE; Ercia, A; Caskey, F; Rees, M; Farrington, K; van der Veer, SN (BMC, 2021-07-18)
      Background: Successful implementation of digital health systems requires contextually sensitive solutions. Working directly with system users and drawing on implementation science frameworks are both recommended. We sought to combine Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) with participatory co-design methods, to work with healthcare stakeholders to generate implementation support recommendations for a new electronic patient reported outcome measure (ePRO) in renal services. ePROs collect data on patient-reported symptom burden and illness experience overtime, requiring sustained engagement and integration into existing systems. Methods: We identified co-design methods that could be mapped to NPT constructs to generate relevant qualitative data. Patients and staff from three renal units in England participated in empathy and process mapping activities to understand ‘coherence’ (why the ePRO should be completed) and ‘cognitive participation’ (who would be involved in collecting the ePRO). Observation of routine unit activity was completed to understand ‘collective action’ (how the collection of ePRO could integrate with service routines). Results: The mapping activities and observation enabled the research team to become more aware of the key needs of both staff and patients. Working within sites enabled us to consider local resources and barriers. This produced ‘core and custom’ recommendations specifying core needs that could be met with customised local solutions. We identified two over-arching themes which need to be considered when introducing new digital systems (1) That data collection is physical (electronic systems need to fit into physical spaces and routines), and (2) That data collection is intentional (system users must be convinced of the value of collecting the data). Conclusions: We demonstrate that NPT constructs can be operationalised through participatory co-design to work with stakeholders and within settings to collaboratively produce implementation support recommendations. This enables production of contextually sensitive implementation recommendations, informed by qualitative evidence, theory, and stakeholder input. Further longitudinal evaluation is necessary to determine how successful the recommendations are in practice.
    • The end of meaningful work in charities? A case study of ethics in employee relations

      Wang, Wen; Seifert, Roger (Springer, 2021-07-12)
      Developed from meaningful work and business ethics, we investigate the motivational effect of meaningful work on paid staff (not volunteers) with a “shortage” of ethical employment practices situated in the Not-for-Profit sector. We tested the traditional notion of meaningful work by nature and by line manager support (under its business-like practices) to compensate for the “sacrifice” (low pay and job stress caused by poor employment terms) of front line staff working alongside professional managers paid the market rate. Using a mixed-method case study, we employed SEM modelling to analyse a staff survey of 125 valid responses and administrative records of staff resignation, alongside interviews. The results show that meaningful work by nature and by line manager support are positively and significantly associated with job satisfaction but neither has a significant effect on staff resignation action. There is no empirical evidence to support the compensating effect of meaningful work by nature; meaningful work by line manager support has a stronger effect only through reduced job stress, rather than compensating for the low pay, in preventing resignation. The qualitative analysis reveals that continued low pay and using precarious employment contracts have evoked the questioning of ethics of employment practices in this sector. We discuss the implications and suggest further areas of research.
    • Evaluating the antecedents of health destination loyalty: The moderating role of destination trust and tourists’ emotions

      Elbaz, Ahmed Mohamed; Kamar, Mahmoud Sayed Abou; Onjewu, Adah-Kole Emmanuel; Soliman, Mohammad (Taylor & Francis, 2021-06-02)
      Although the customer experience-satisfaction nexus is a highly developed body of work in the wider literature, this link has scarcely been explored in health tourism. Accordingly, this paper aims to assess the dimensions of health services experiences leading to tourists’ satisfaction and the moderating role of trust and emotions in the link between satisfaction and destination loyalty. A PLS-SEM is employed to analyze data from a sample of 225 health tourists in Egypt. The results show that health tourism experiences dimensions significantly affect tourists’ satisfaction, which in turn positively impacts their loyalty. Additionally, destination trust and emotions moderate the connection between satisfaction and loyalty. Theoretical contributions arise for scholars and practical ramifications are presented for service providers and stakeholders in the Egyptian health tourism scene.
    • Higher education contexts of entrepreneurship education outcomes in Sub-Saharan Africa

      Anosike, Uchenna Paschal; Oluwatobi, Stephen (North American Business Press, 2021-06-02)
      Motivated by the growing emphasis to influence young people’s post-study career intentions through entrepreneurship education, particularly in Africa where poverty and conflict have been associated with high youth unemployment, this paper articulates the effect of entrepreneurship education on entrepreneurial intention amongst students and graduates from two higher education institutions in conflict-torn northern Nigeria. By relying on systematic analysis following semi-structured interviews, the findings showed that newly acquired knowledge and skills in use of market intelligence, business plan writing and record-keeping were not only linked with entrepreneurial intentions, but it also emerged that the volatile context of the business environment influenced strategic decisions related to new business growth and survival. Research and policy implications were considered based on the findings.
    • Introduction

      Stylos, Nikolaos; Rahimi, Roya; Okumus, Bendegul; Williams, Sarah; Rahimi, Roya; Stylos, Nikolaos; Okumus, Bendegul; Williams, Sarah (Springer Nature, 2021-06-01)