Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFlavell, K.J.
dc.contributor.authorBiddulph, J.P.
dc.contributor.authorPowell, J.E.
dc.contributor.authorParkes, S.E.
dc.contributor.authorRedfern, D.
dc.contributor.authorWeinreb, M.
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Paul N.
dc.contributor.authorMann, J.R.
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Lawrence S.
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Paul G.
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-04T10:30:12Z
dc.date.available2008-06-04T10:30:12Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Cancer, 85 (3): 350-6
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920
dc.identifier.pmid11487264
dc.identifier.doi10.1054/bjoc.2001.1872
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29447
dc.description.abstractIn order to further define the factors associated with the observed variations in the Epstein-Barr virus-positive rate in childhood Hodgkin's disease, we have studied the effect of material deprivation (measured by the Townsend score) and ethnic origin on the frequency of Epstein-Barr virus-positivity in 55 cases of childhood Hodgkin's disease, diagnosed between 1981 and 1999, from a multi-ethnic region of the United Kingdom. Epstein-Barr virus status was determined by immunohistochemistry for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded latent membrane protein-1. 62% of cases were Epstein-Barr virus-positive. Ethnic group was the strongest predictor of Epstein-Barr virus-positivity, with South Asians having a more than 20-fold risk of being Epstein-Barr virus-positive compared with non-South Asians. An increased risk was still present after adjusting for deprivation. Townsend scores were significantly higher (indicating more deprivation) in the Epstein-Barr virus-positive group, particularly in males. The relative risk of Epstein-Barr virus-positivity showed a gradient with increasing Townsend score; the risk being 7-times higher in the most deprived quartile compared with the least deprived group. Although the association between Townsend score and Epstein-Barr virus-positivity was reduced after adjusting for ethnic group, the risk of Epstein-Barr virus-positivity was still 3-times higher in the most deprived compared with the least deprived quartile. In addition, cases having 2 or more siblings were 5-times as likely to be Epstein-Barr virus-positive as those from smaller families. These results provide the first evidence of a strong association between Epstein-Barr virus-positive Hodgkin's disease and South Asian children from the United Kingdom. In addition, deprivation may increase the likelihood of Epstein-Barr virus-positive disease independently of ethnicity.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/bjc/journal/v85/n3/abs/6691872a.html
dc.subjectHodgkin's Disease
dc.subjectEpstein-Barr virus
dc.subjectEthnicity
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectMaterial deprivation
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Viral
dc.subject.meshAsia
dc.subject.meshChildren
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshEconomics
dc.subject.meshEpstein-Barr Virus Infections
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistry
dc.subject.meshIn Situ Hybridization
dc.subject.meshIncidence
dc.subject.meshInfant
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors
dc.subject.meshViral Matrix Proteins
dc.titleSouth Asian ethnicity and material deprivation increase the risk of Epstein-Barr virus infection in childhood Hodgkin's disease.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Cancer
html.description.abstractIn order to further define the factors associated with the observed variations in the Epstein-Barr virus-positive rate in childhood Hodgkin's disease, we have studied the effect of material deprivation (measured by the Townsend score) and ethnic origin on the frequency of Epstein-Barr virus-positivity in 55 cases of childhood Hodgkin's disease, diagnosed between 1981 and 1999, from a multi-ethnic region of the United Kingdom. Epstein-Barr virus status was determined by immunohistochemistry for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded latent membrane protein-1. 62% of cases were Epstein-Barr virus-positive. Ethnic group was the strongest predictor of Epstein-Barr virus-positivity, with South Asians having a more than 20-fold risk of being Epstein-Barr virus-positive compared with non-South Asians. An increased risk was still present after adjusting for deprivation. Townsend scores were significantly higher (indicating more deprivation) in the Epstein-Barr virus-positive group, particularly in males. The relative risk of Epstein-Barr virus-positivity showed a gradient with increasing Townsend score; the risk being 7-times higher in the most deprived quartile compared with the least deprived group. Although the association between Townsend score and Epstein-Barr virus-positivity was reduced after adjusting for ethnic group, the risk of Epstein-Barr virus-positivity was still 3-times higher in the most deprived compared with the least deprived quartile. In addition, cases having 2 or more siblings were 5-times as likely to be Epstein-Barr virus-positive as those from smaller families. These results provide the first evidence of a strong association between Epstein-Barr virus-positive Hodgkin's disease and South Asian children from the United Kingdom. In addition, deprivation may increase the likelihood of Epstein-Barr virus-positive disease independently of ethnicity.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record