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dc.contributor.authorGalbraith, Niall
dc.contributor.authorManktelow, Ken I.
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Neil
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-04T09:55:32Z
dc.date.available2008-06-04T09:55:32Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Psychology, 2008, 99 (Pt 1): 29-44
dc.identifier.issn0007-1269
dc.identifier.pmid17535473
dc.identifier.doi10.1348/000712607X204317
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/29442
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies (e.g. Moller & Husby, 2000; Blackwood et al., 2004) have revealed that delusional thinking is accompanied by an exaggerated focus upon the self and upon stimuli that are perceived to be related to the self. The objective was to examine whether those high in subclinical delusional ideation exhibit a heightened tendency for self-reference. Using a mixed design, healthy individuals, classified into high- and low-scoring groups on the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory (Peters, Day, & Garety, 1996), were compared on everyday reasoning tasks across three experiments. High-PDI scorers, in contrast to the low-PDI group, rated self-referent objections to everyday arguments as stronger than other-referent objections and formulated more self-referent assertion-based objections to everyday arguments. The findings support the notion that subclinical delusional ideation is linked to a self-reference bias, which is evident in the sort of everyday thinking that people engage in when forming or evaluating their beliefs and which may contribute to delusion formation.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBritish Psychological Society
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpsoc/bjp/2008/00000099/00000001/art00002?token=00541f43350ac8ca93015517e2a46762c475f5d367646707b3a7b6d24673f7b2f27375f2a72752d70407
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshCognition
dc.subject.meshDecision Making
dc.subject.meshDelusions
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshSelf Concept
dc.titleSubclinical delusional ideation and a self-reference bias in everyday reasoning.
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Psychology
html.description.abstractPrevious studies (e.g. Moller & Husby, 2000; Blackwood et al., 2004) have revealed that delusional thinking is accompanied by an exaggerated focus upon the self and upon stimuli that are perceived to be related to the self. The objective was to examine whether those high in subclinical delusional ideation exhibit a heightened tendency for self-reference. Using a mixed design, healthy individuals, classified into high- and low-scoring groups on the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory (Peters, Day, & Garety, 1996), were compared on everyday reasoning tasks across three experiments. High-PDI scorers, in contrast to the low-PDI group, rated self-referent objections to everyday arguments as stronger than other-referent objections and formulated more self-referent assertion-based objections to everyday arguments. The findings support the notion that subclinical delusional ideation is linked to a self-reference bias, which is evident in the sort of everyday thinking that people engage in when forming or evaluating their beliefs and which may contribute to delusion formation.


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