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dc.contributor.authorAbdulai, Raymond Talinbe
dc.contributor.authorNdekugri, Issaka E.
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-29T10:52:27Z
dc.date.available2008-05-29T10:52:27Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationHabitat International, 31(2): 257-267
dc.identifier.issn0197-3975
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.habitatint.2007.02.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/28833
dc.description.abstractIn Ghana, land is vested in families and chiefs in the traditional land sector. These corporate bodies, referred to as customary landholding institutions control over 90% of the total land area in the country. The institutions therefore govern access to land. Urban centres in Ghana are plagued with a plethora of problems and one of them is inadequate housing. The urban housing problem is partly attributed to the existence and operation of the institutions. The customary landholding system is perceived as communal landownership, which does not permit individual ownership. It is thus argued that the system does not provide incentives for investing in housing development. This paper reports on a study carried out to test the assertion that the system does not permit individual ownership using two urban centres as case studies. The analysis shows that the operation of the institutions permits individual landownership. The traditional landownership system cannot therefore be the cause of the urban housing problem based on the premise that it does not permit individual ownership of land rights.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAmsterdam: Elsevier
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V9H-4NHM6DM-1&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=10362368577335dd78d50a84db3bb73e
dc.subjectTraditional landholding institutions
dc.subjectCommunal landholding
dc.subjectLand rights
dc.subjectHousing development
dc.subjectGhana
dc.subjectAfrica
dc.subjectSub-Saharan Africa
dc.subjectLand ownership
dc.subjectEconomic development
dc.subjectLand tenure
dc.subjectProperty rights
dc.subjectIndividual ownership
dc.subjectSocioeconomics
dc.subjectUrbanisation
dc.subjectUrban housing
dc.titleCustomary Landholding Institutions and Housing Development in Urban Centres of Ghana : Case Studies of Kumasi and Wa
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalHabitat International
html.description.abstractIn Ghana, land is vested in families and chiefs in the traditional land sector. These corporate bodies, referred to as customary landholding institutions control over 90% of the total land area in the country. The institutions therefore govern access to land. Urban centres in Ghana are plagued with a plethora of problems and one of them is inadequate housing. The urban housing problem is partly attributed to the existence and operation of the institutions. The customary landholding system is perceived as communal landownership, which does not permit individual ownership. It is thus argued that the system does not provide incentives for investing in housing development. This paper reports on a study carried out to test the assertion that the system does not permit individual ownership using two urban centres as case studies. The analysis shows that the operation of the institutions permits individual landownership. The traditional landownership system cannot therefore be the cause of the urban housing problem based on the premise that it does not permit individual ownership of land rights.


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