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dc.contributor.authorCox, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorDannehl, Karin
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T19:39:59Z
dc.date.available2008-05-20T19:39:59Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.isbn9780754637714
dc.identifier.isbn0754637719
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/27194
dc.description.abstractWhilst there has been much recent scholarly work on retailing during the early modern period, less is known about how people at the time perceived retailing, both as onlookers, artists and commentators, and as participants. Centred on the general theme of perceptions, the authors address this gap in our knowledge by looking at a different aspect of consumption. They focus on two ancillary themes: the first is location and how contemporaries perceived the settlements in which there were shops; the other is distance. Pictures, prints, novels, diaries and promotional literature of the tradespeople themselves provide much of the evidence. Many of these sources are not new to historians, but they have not been scrutinized and analysed with the questions in mind that are posed here. The methodology to be employed has been developed by Nancy Cox over the last decade, and is used successfully in her book The Complete Tradesman and in the compilation of the forthcoming Dictionary of Traded Goods and Commodities 1550–1800. This book will find a ready market with scholars concerned with British social and economic history in the early modern period. Although it is first and foremost a book written by historians for historians, it nevertheless borrows concepts and approaches from various disciplines concerned with theories of consumption, material culture and representational art. (Ashgate Publishing)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAldershot: Ashgate Publishing
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ashgate.com/default.aspx?page=637&calcTitle=1&title_id=6905&edition_id=7371
dc.subjectEnglish history
dc.subjectEarly modern period
dc.subjectTrade goods
dc.subjectRetail history
dc.subjectEconomic history
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectConsumers
dc.subjectCommodities
dc.titlePerceptions of Retailing in Early Modern England
dc.typeAuthored book
html.description.abstractWhilst there has been much recent scholarly work on retailing during the early modern period, less is known about how people at the time perceived retailing, both as onlookers, artists and commentators, and as participants. Centred on the general theme of perceptions, the authors address this gap in our knowledge by looking at a different aspect of consumption. They focus on two ancillary themes: the first is location and how contemporaries perceived the settlements in which there were shops; the other is distance. Pictures, prints, novels, diaries and promotional literature of the tradespeople themselves provide much of the evidence. Many of these sources are not new to historians, but they have not been scrutinized and analysed with the questions in mind that are posed here. The methodology to be employed has been developed by Nancy Cox over the last decade, and is used successfully in her book The Complete Tradesman and in the compilation of the forthcoming Dictionary of Traded Goods and Commodities 1550–1800. This book will find a ready market with scholars concerned with British social and economic history in the early modern period. Although it is first and foremost a book written by historians for historians, it nevertheless borrows concepts and approaches from various disciplines concerned with theories of consumption, material culture and representational art. (Ashgate Publishing)


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