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dc.contributor.authorO'Kane, Eammon
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T19:51:23Z
dc.date.available2008-05-20T19:51:23Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-22
dc.identifier.citationCivil Wars, 8(3&4): 268-284
dc.identifier.issn1369-8249
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13698240601060710
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/27185
dc.description.abstractThe idea that conflicts cannot be resolved until they are 'ripe' has been influential in conflict resolution literature in recent years. This article critiques the theoretical underpinnings of ripeness using the Northern Ireland peace process as a case study. It highlights the problems that results from the subjectiveness of both the theory itself and the information needed to apply it. By critically examining William Zartman's six 'propositions' of ripeness, the inadequacy of the approach is highlighted and claims that the theory can help predict when conflicts are ripe for resolution are shown to be unsustainable. It advocates a more dynamic approach to conflict resolution than ripeness suggests that parties and mediators adopt. (Informaworld)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLondon: Routledge
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a768571838~db=all
dc.subjectPeace negotiation
dc.subjectNorthern Ireland
dc.subject20th century
dc.subjectPolitical history
dc.subjectReconciliation
dc.subjectPolitical theory
dc.subjectWar studies
dc.subjectConflict resolution
dc.titleWhen Can Conflicts Be Resolved? A Critique of Ripeness
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalCivil Wars
html.description.abstractThe idea that conflicts cannot be resolved until they are 'ripe' has been influential in conflict resolution literature in recent years. This article critiques the theoretical underpinnings of ripeness using the Northern Ireland peace process as a case study. It highlights the problems that results from the subjectiveness of both the theory itself and the information needed to apply it. By critically examining William Zartman's six 'propositions' of ripeness, the inadequacy of the approach is highlighted and claims that the theory can help predict when conflicts are ripe for resolution are shown to be unsustainable. It advocates a more dynamic approach to conflict resolution than ripeness suggests that parties and mediators adopt. (Informaworld)


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