Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorO'Kane, Eammon
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T19:48:51Z
dc.date.available2008-05-20T19:48:51Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationContemporary British History, 18(1): 78-99
dc.identifier.issn13619462
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1361946042000217310
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/27183
dc.description.abstractIn the early 1990s the British and Irish governments moved away from the policy of attempting to marginalise the IRA and Sinn Féin to enticing republicanism into mainstream politics. This article examines why the two governments made this apparent shift in policy. The British and Irish governments were persuaded to change their policy on Northern Ireland due to a variety of factors, all of which need to be examined if the origins of the peace process are to be understood. The article questions existing explanations that portray the origins of the peace process and the Downing Street Declaration as simply a victory for Irish nationalism without taking account of the concessions secured by the British government from the Irish during the protracted negotiations. (Ingenta)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/routledg/cbh/2004/00000018/00000001/art00004
dc.subjectIrish history
dc.subjectBritish history
dc.subject20th century
dc.subjectGovernment policy
dc.subjectRepublicanism
dc.subjectPolitical history
dc.subjectPeace negotiation
dc.subjectReconciliation
dc.subjectSinn Féin
dc.subjectDowning Street Declaration 1993
dc.titleAnglo-Irish Relations and the Northern Ireland Peace Process: From Exclusion to Inclusion.
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalContemporary British History
html.description.abstractIn the early 1990s the British and Irish governments moved away from the policy of attempting to marginalise the IRA and Sinn Féin to enticing republicanism into mainstream politics. This article examines why the two governments made this apparent shift in policy. The British and Irish governments were persuaded to change their policy on Northern Ireland due to a variety of factors, all of which need to be examined if the origins of the peace process are to be understood. The article questions existing explanations that portray the origins of the peace process and the Downing Street Declaration as simply a victory for Irish nationalism without taking account of the concessions secured by the British government from the Irish during the protracted negotiations. (Ingenta)


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record