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dc.contributor.authorDangerfield, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T18:27:45Z
dc.date.available2008-05-20T18:27:45Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics, 23(4): 478-500
dc.identifier.issn1352-3279
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13523270701674566
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/27113
dc.description.abstractMany believe that the European Union, even if it has not caused a new division of Europe, has been complicit in the creation of such a division by virtue of different strategies towards alternative groups of post-communist countries. However, have the 'Europeanization' prospects of 'left-out' countries in fact already been predetermined by the alternative strategies of the EU. A number of key questions arise in this context. Is 'inclusion' really dependent on whether the EU has given a membership promise? How true is it actually to speak of alternative EU strategies towards post-communist countries? Is a different perspective on the issue of inclusion or exclusion possible if we concentrate on the European integration process rather than regarding EU membership per se as the key to whether the future trajectory of Europe is continuation of division or end of it? Finally, what role are sub-regional co-operation processes playing in the Europeanization of so-called 'left-out countries'? (Informaworld)
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLondon: Taylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/13523270701674566
dc.subjectEuropean Union
dc.subjectEuropean history
dc.subjectPost-communist countries
dc.subjectIntegration
dc.subjectEuropeanisation
dc.subjectLeft-out countries
dc.subjectPolitical history
dc.subject21st century
dc.subjectPolitical strategy
dc.subjectEconomic strategy
dc.subjectRegional cooperation
dc.subjectEU accession
dc.titleThe European Union and post-communist Europe: One approach or several?
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics
html.description.abstractMany believe that the European Union, even if it has not caused a new division of Europe, has been complicit in the creation of such a division by virtue of different strategies towards alternative groups of post-communist countries. However, have the 'Europeanization' prospects of 'left-out' countries in fact already been predetermined by the alternative strategies of the EU. A number of key questions arise in this context. Is 'inclusion' really dependent on whether the EU has given a membership promise? How true is it actually to speak of alternative EU strategies towards post-communist countries? Is a different perspective on the issue of inclusion or exclusion possible if we concentrate on the European integration process rather than regarding EU membership per se as the key to whether the future trajectory of Europe is continuation of division or end of it? Finally, what role are sub-regional co-operation processes playing in the Europeanization of so-called 'left-out countries'? (Informaworld)


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