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dc.contributor.authorThelwall, Mike
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Liz
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-19T16:32:45Z
dc.date.available2008-05-19T16:32:45Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 57 (10): 1326 - 1337
dc.identifier.issn15322882
dc.identifier.issn15322890
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/asi.20437
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26896
dc.description.abstractWord usage is of interest to linguists for its own sake as well as to social scientists and others who seek to track the spread of ideas, for example, in public debates over political decisions. The historical evolution of language can be analyzed with the tools of corpus linguistics through evolving corpora and the Web. But word usage statistics can only be gathered for known words. In this article, techniques are described and tested for identifying new words from the Web, focusing on the case when the words are related to a topic and have a hybrid form with a common sequence of letters. The results highlight the need to employ a combination of search techniques and show the wide potential of hybrid word family investigations in linguistics and social science.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.urlhttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/112650748/abstract
dc.subjectLinguistics
dc.subjectWord usage
dc.subjectInternet use
dc.subjectWebometrics
dc.subjectLanguage evolution
dc.subjectInformation dissemination
dc.titleLanguage evolution and the spread of ideas on the Web: A procedure for identifying emergent hybrid word family members
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
html.description.abstractWord usage is of interest to linguists for its own sake as well as to social scientists and others who seek to track the spread of ideas, for example, in public debates over political decisions. The historical evolution of language can be analyzed with the tools of corpus linguistics through evolving corpora and the Web. But word usage statistics can only be gathered for known words. In this article, techniques are described and tested for identifying new words from the Web, focusing on the case when the words are related to a topic and have a hybrid form with a common sequence of letters. The results highlight the need to employ a combination of search techniques and show the wide potential of hybrid word family investigations in linguistics and social science.


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