Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMather, Kim
dc.contributor.authorWorrall, Les
dc.contributor.authorSeifert, Roger
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-19T15:02:39Z
dc.date.available2008-05-19T15:02:39Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationPersonnel Review, 36 (1): 109-127
dc.identifier.issn00483486
dc.identifier.issn00000000
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/00483480710716740
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26766
dc.description.abstractPurpose – The purpose of this article is to examine how the labour process of further education lecturers has changed as a result of legislative reforms introduced in the early 1990s. Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on labour process theory and emergent perspectives on “the new public management” to provide theoretical frameworks. Evidence is derived from research carried out at three FE colleges in the English West Midlands involving interviews with managers and lecturing staff, documentary material and a survey of lecturing staff employed in the colleges. Findings – Market-based reforms in this sector have resulted in the intensification and extensification of work effort for lecturers. This paper argues that these changes have been driven by the ideological underpinning of the reform process. Individual and collective acts of lecturer resistance have been insufficiently strong to prevent change from occurring and worker alienation has increased. Research limitations/implications – The case study method renders generalisability of findings difficult. Comparative studies in other localities and sectors are needed. Practical implications – The research indicates that the “new managerialism” – which has developed in the public sector – has created an increasingly alienated workforce and that the processes of change in many institutions have had negative outcomes. Originality/value – The research demonstrates and application of labour process theory, supported by empirical evidence, as a means for examining the changing experiences of a group of public sector workers and assessing the effect of the “new managerialism” on workers' experiences.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEmerald
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/viewContentItem.do?contentType=Article&contentId=1588969
dc.subjectFurther education
dc.subjectOrganisational change
dc.subjectPublic sector reform
dc.titleReforming Further Education: the changing labour process for college lecturers
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalPersonnel Review
html.description.abstractPurpose – The purpose of this article is to examine how the labour process of further education lecturers has changed as a result of legislative reforms introduced in the early 1990s. Design/methodology/approach – The paper draws on labour process theory and emergent perspectives on “the new public management” to provide theoretical frameworks. Evidence is derived from research carried out at three FE colleges in the English West Midlands involving interviews with managers and lecturing staff, documentary material and a survey of lecturing staff employed in the colleges. Findings – Market-based reforms in this sector have resulted in the intensification and extensification of work effort for lecturers. This paper argues that these changes have been driven by the ideological underpinning of the reform process. Individual and collective acts of lecturer resistance have been insufficiently strong to prevent change from occurring and worker alienation has increased. Research limitations/implications – The case study method renders generalisability of findings difficult. Comparative studies in other localities and sectors are needed. Practical implications – The research indicates that the “new managerialism” – which has developed in the public sector – has created an increasingly alienated workforce and that the processes of change in many institutions have had negative outcomes. Originality/value – The research demonstrates and application of labour process theory, supported by empirical evidence, as a means for examining the changing experiences of a group of public sector workers and assessing the effect of the “new managerialism” on workers' experiences.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record