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dc.contributor.authorWoolf, Harvey
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-16T08:49:20Z
dc.date.available2008-05-16T08:49:20Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 29 (4): 479-493
dc.identifier.issn02602938
dc.identifier.issn1469297X
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02602930310001689046
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26396
dc.description.abstractThis article reviews the findings of a small-scale investigation into the criteria used by a number of SACWG departments for assessing final-year project modules in business and history and other written history assignments. The findings provide the basis for a broader discussion of the issues relating to the formulation and use of assessment criteria. Assessment entails academics making professional judgements about the standards and quality of students' work. However, for the educational value of the work entailed in developing assessment criteria to be fully realized, there needs to be a higher level of shared understanding than currently exists (among students, tutors and other stakeholders) of the language in which criteria are couched and the ways in which criteria are applied.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis)
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/02602930310001689046
dc.subjectAssessment
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectFinal year modules
dc.subjectBusiness and history
dc.titleAssessment criteria: reflections on current practices
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalAssessment & Evaluation in Higher Education
html.description.abstractThis article reviews the findings of a small-scale investigation into the criteria used by a number of SACWG departments for assessing final-year project modules in business and history and other written history assignments. The findings provide the basis for a broader discussion of the issues relating to the formulation and use of assessment criteria. Assessment entails academics making professional judgements about the standards and quality of students' work. However, for the educational value of the work entailed in developing assessment criteria to be fully realized, there needs to be a higher level of shared understanding than currently exists (among students, tutors and other stakeholders) of the language in which criteria are couched and the ways in which criteria are applied.


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