Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Angela
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Kevin
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-16T08:39:46Z
dc.date.available2008-05-16T08:39:46Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Special Education, 32(3): 149–156
dc.identifier.issn09523383
dc.identifier.issn14768578
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.0952-3383.2005.00388.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26394
dc.description.abstractA placement at the National Institute of Conductive Education (NICE) in Birmingham for children with motor disorders is strongly preferred over mainstream or special schools by some parents, but it has been noted that this is usually refused following the current statementing process. Although funding constraints have been articulated, Angela Morgan, a Research Fellow at the Wolverhampton University Policy Research Institute, and Kevin Hogan, also at the University of Wolverhampton, contend in this article that other explanations are possible, as variability remains in placement decisions. The experiences of education administrators working within the special educational needs departments of local education authorities who make the ultimate decision regarding school placement have hitherto been unexplored. This study offers findings from an exploratory qualitative study, which suggests that administrators are working from disparate understandings of conductive education within an arena fraught with conflict. Recommendations derived from the study include further in-service training for education administrators and prior training for individuals seeking a career in education administration to enhance collaborative working partnerships between administrators and parents.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley InterScience
dc.relation.urlhttp://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118704501/abstract
dc.subjectSpecial educational needs
dc.subjectSchools
dc.subjectPlacement
dc.subjectEducational administration
dc.subjectPhysical disabilities
dc.subjectConductive education
dc.titleSchool placement and conductive education: the experiences of education administrators
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Special Education
html.description.abstractA placement at the National Institute of Conductive Education (NICE) in Birmingham for children with motor disorders is strongly preferred over mainstream or special schools by some parents, but it has been noted that this is usually refused following the current statementing process. Although funding constraints have been articulated, Angela Morgan, a Research Fellow at the Wolverhampton University Policy Research Institute, and Kevin Hogan, also at the University of Wolverhampton, contend in this article that other explanations are possible, as variability remains in placement decisions. The experiences of education administrators working within the special educational needs departments of local education authorities who make the ultimate decision regarding school placement have hitherto been unexplored. This study offers findings from an exploratory qualitative study, which suggests that administrators are working from disparate understandings of conductive education within an arena fraught with conflict. Recommendations derived from the study include further in-service training for education administrators and prior training for individuals seeking a career in education administration to enhance collaborative working partnerships between administrators and parents.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record