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dc.contributor.authorAvis, James
dc.contributor.authorKendall, Alex
dc.contributor.authorParsons, John
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-15T10:19:38Z
dc.date.available2008-05-15T10:19:38Z
dc.date.issued2006-12-20
dc.identifier.citationResearch in Post-Compulsory Education, 8 (2): 179-196
dc.identifier.issn13596748
dc.identifier.issn17475112
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13596740300200148
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26178
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the expectations and experiences of staff new to the FE/HE sector. The research involved the use of focus group interviews supported by a questionnaire. Key findings of the research indicate the pervasiveness of managerialism and the intensification of labour across sectors. Findings also suggest that there is a blurring of the division between labour processes within the new University and FE sectors, and a shared discourse about learners and their expectations of learning. Orientations to research were differentiated within and across the sectors, and those new to FE were largely unaware of the thrust towards the development of practicebased/evidence-based research.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/13596740300200148
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectAdult education
dc.subjectLifelong learning
dc.subjectFurther education
dc.titleCrossing the boundaries: expectations and experience of newcomers to higher and further education
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalResearch in Post-Compulsory Education
html.description.abstractThis article examines the expectations and experiences of staff new to the FE/HE sector. The research involved the use of focus group interviews supported by a questionnaire. Key findings of the research indicate the pervasiveness of managerialism and the intensification of labour across sectors. Findings also suggest that there is a blurring of the division between labour processes within the new University and FE sectors, and a shared discourse about learners and their expectations of learning. Orientations to research were differentiated within and across the sectors, and those new to FE were largely unaware of the thrust towards the development of practicebased/evidence-based research.


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