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dc.contributor.authorHadfield, Mark
dc.contributor.authorHaw, Kaye
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-15T09:59:35Z
dc.date.available2008-05-15T09:59:35Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.citationEducational Action Research, 9 (3): 485-502
dc.identifier.issn09650792
dc.identifier.issn17475074
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09650790100200165
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26173
dc.description.abstractThis article moves from an overview of what is meant by the term 'voice' to discussing the significance of its links with action research. It does this through using a simple typology of three types of voice: Authoritative, Critical and Therapeutic. Each type of voice represents a different process of articulation and intended outcome. It then moves on to consider 'voice' and the collaboration of young people in educational action research by unpicking a series of four assumptions which delineate major theoretical and practical possibilities and limitations. These assumptions provide a critique of the underpinning ideologies held by professionals when supporting and listening to young people
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/09650790100200165
dc.subjectVoice type
dc.subjectAuthoritative voice
dc.subjectCritical voice
dc.subjectTherapeutic voice
dc.subjectArticulation
dc.subjectYoung people
dc.title'Voice', young people and action research
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalEducational Action Research
html.description.abstractThis article moves from an overview of what is meant by the term 'voice' to discussing the significance of its links with action research. It does this through using a simple typology of three types of voice: Authoritative, Critical and Therapeutic. Each type of voice represents a different process of articulation and intended outcome. It then moves on to consider 'voice' and the collaboration of young people in educational action research by unpicking a series of four assumptions which delineate major theoretical and practical possibilities and limitations. These assumptions provide a critique of the underpinning ideologies held by professionals when supporting and listening to young people


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