Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWeatherston, David
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-15T09:49:07Z
dc.date.available2008-05-15T09:49:07Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 47(6): 698-713
dc.identifier.issn0306624X
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0306624X03257244
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/26156
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the connections between mental illness and terrorism. Most social scientists have discounted a causal relationship between mental illness and terrorism. This is not necessarily always the case within terrorism studies, the media, or political circles where the psychology of terrorism is often expressed in the language of mentalisms, and theories of pathologisation continue to exist. This article reaffirms the view that apart from certain pathological cases, there is no causal connection between an individual’s mental disorder and engagement in terrorist activity. The individual terrorist’s motivations can be explained by other factors, including behavioural psychology. However, there may be a connection between an individual engaging in terrorist activity and developing a mental disorder[s]. Certain stressors that occur because of terrorist activity may result in psychological disturbance in terrorist individuals. These factors may partially explain terrorist group instability and should be taken into account when detaining and interrogating terrorist suspects.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSage Publications
dc.relation.urlhttp://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=141554231&ETOC=RN&from=searchenginehttp://ijo.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/47/6/698
dc.subjectCriminal psychology
dc.subjectTerrorism
dc.subjectTerrorist psychology
dc.subjectAbnormal psychology
dc.subjectMental illness
dc.titleTerrorism and Mental Illness: Is There A Relationship?
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
html.description.abstractThis article examines the connections between mental illness and terrorism. Most social scientists have discounted a causal relationship between mental illness and terrorism. This is not necessarily always the case within terrorism studies, the media, or political circles where the psychology of terrorism is often expressed in the language of mentalisms, and theories of pathologisation continue to exist. This article reaffirms the view that apart from certain pathological cases, there is no causal connection between an individual’s mental disorder and engagement in terrorist activity. The individual terrorist’s motivations can be explained by other factors, including behavioural psychology. However, there may be a connection between an individual engaging in terrorist activity and developing a mental disorder[s]. Certain stressors that occur because of terrorist activity may result in psychological disturbance in terrorist individuals. These factors may partially explain terrorist group instability and should be taken into account when detaining and interrogating terrorist suspects.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record