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dc.contributor.authorCartwright, Martin J.
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-14T09:23:42Z
dc.date.available2008-05-14T09:23:42Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationQuality Assurance in Education, 15(3): 287-301
dc.identifier.issn09684883
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/09684880710773174
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/25899
dc.description.abstractPurpose – The paper aims to describe research undertaken in two post-1992 universities into staff perceptions of and reactions to the rhetoric of the national quality agenda in the UK as expressed by bodies such as the Quality Assurance Agency and the discourse about quality implicit in that agenda. The research examined how academic staff engaged with the discourse and the extent to which the rhetoric of quality is reflected in the day-to-day realities of post-1992 universities. Design/methodology/approach – The research involved a qualitative investigation of the personal experiences of six academics employed in two post-1992 universities and comprised in-depth interviews around three themes which were undertaken during 2005 and 2006. The data from the interviews are summarised and paraphrased in a way which faithfully and accurately captures the sense and spirit of each of the interviews as validated by the interviewees. Findings – The paper concludes that from the point of view of the academic staff who formed part of this research there is a considerable mismatch between the rhetoric of the official paragons of quality represented by the Quality Assurance Agency and the experience of quality by academic staff embroiled in the quality systems that the two universities involved in this research had developed as a consequence of the requirements of government and government agencies. Originality/value – This paper will be of interest to academics and academic managers with responsibilities for quality assurance not only in universities with mature quality assurance systems but also in those in which such systems are being introduced or developed.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/Insight/menuNavigation.do;jsessionid=7430727DF9CAF24C1BAF88AD55DC5536?hdAction=InsightHome
dc.subjectLecturers
dc.subjectQuality
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectUK
dc.subjectPost-1992 universities
dc.titleThe rhetoric and reality of “quality” in higher education: An investigation into staff perceptions of quality in post 1992 universities
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalQuality Assurance in Education
html.description.abstractPurpose – The paper aims to describe research undertaken in two post-1992 universities into staff perceptions of and reactions to the rhetoric of the national quality agenda in the UK as expressed by bodies such as the Quality Assurance Agency and the discourse about quality implicit in that agenda. The research examined how academic staff engaged with the discourse and the extent to which the rhetoric of quality is reflected in the day-to-day realities of post-1992 universities. Design/methodology/approach – The research involved a qualitative investigation of the personal experiences of six academics employed in two post-1992 universities and comprised in-depth interviews around three themes which were undertaken during 2005 and 2006. The data from the interviews are summarised and paraphrased in a way which faithfully and accurately captures the sense and spirit of each of the interviews as validated by the interviewees. Findings – The paper concludes that from the point of view of the academic staff who formed part of this research there is a considerable mismatch between the rhetoric of the official paragons of quality represented by the Quality Assurance Agency and the experience of quality by academic staff embroiled in the quality systems that the two universities involved in this research had developed as a consequence of the requirements of government and government agencies. Originality/value – This paper will be of interest to academics and academic managers with responsibilities for quality assurance not only in universities with mature quality assurance systems but also in those in which such systems are being introduced or developed.


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