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dc.contributor.authorBartram, Brendan
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-13T09:54:51Zen
dc.date.available2008-05-13T09:54:51Zen
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Studies in International Education, 11 (2): 205-214
dc.identifier.issn10283153
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1028315306297731
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/25672
dc.description.abstractThe following article examines the sociocultural needs of higher education students on an international degree programme delivered jointly by a post-1992 university in England and a polytechnic institution in the Netherlands. A brief discussion of relevant literature is followed by a methodological overview, detailing the qualitative research design, sample, and method. Results from the focus-group interviews indicate that the majority of students attach great significance to their sociocultural needs in all years of the programme. A number of specific social support mechanisms were identified by the students, as was a greater need for staff assistance in helping the learners create and maintain their social networks. Student views are subsequently compared to those of teaching staff, who articulate a more general awareness of growing student needs and dependency on staff. The article examines these disparities in understandings and discusses staff perceptions of the ways in which institutions might resolve such tensions.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSage
dc.relation.urlhttp://jsi.sagepub.com/content/vol11/issue2/
dc.subjectInternational students
dc.subjectStudent support
dc.subjectJoint degrees
dc.subjectHigher education
dc.subjectEngland
dc.subjectNetherlands
dc.titleThe socio-cultural needs of international students in higher education: a comparison of staff and student views.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Studies in International Education
html.description.abstractThe following article examines the sociocultural needs of higher education students on an international degree programme delivered jointly by a post-1992 university in England and a polytechnic institution in the Netherlands. A brief discussion of relevant literature is followed by a methodological overview, detailing the qualitative research design, sample, and method. Results from the focus-group interviews indicate that the majority of students attach great significance to their sociocultural needs in all years of the programme. A number of specific social support mechanisms were identified by the students, as was a greater need for staff assistance in helping the learners create and maintain their social networks. Student views are subsequently compared to those of teaching staff, who articulate a more general awareness of growing student needs and dependency on staff. The article examines these disparities in understandings and discusses staff perceptions of the ways in which institutions might resolve such tensions.


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