Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDhillon, Jaswinder
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-10T08:31:04Z
dc.date.available2008-04-10T08:31:04Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationResearch in Post-Compulsory Education, 9(1): 147-160
dc.identifier.issn13596748
dc.identifier.issn17475112
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13596740400200163
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/22852
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the experience of adult learners and their perceptions of learning using computer-based learning materials, mainly Learndirect packages. The findings are based on focus group interviews with learners in a range of settings, including centres in community-based organisations, further education colleges and private training providers based in the Midlands region of England. The research forms part of a larger study of partnership working and its role in widening participation in lifelong learning in the Black Country sub-region of England, but this article will focus specifically on the data from focus group interviews with learners. The findings reported here provide an insight into the ability of learners to articulate the benefits and the weakness of learning in this way, and to be clear about their learning goals. The data reveal aspects of the physical, social and psychological learning environment, which help learners participate in learning. This is, of course, useful for practitioners, but the individual stories also reveal deeper and more hurtful previous experiences, which cannot be tackled by tinkering with the learning environment or the learning materials.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherRoutledge (Taylor & Francis)
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13596740400200163
dc.subjectAdult learners
dc.subjectLearndirect
dc.subjectComputer-based learning
dc.subjectMidlands region
dc.subjectWidening participation
dc.subjectLifelong learning
dc.titleAn exploration of adult learners' perspectives of using Learndirect centres as sites for learning
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalResearch in Post-Compulsory Education
html.description.abstractThis article explores the experience of adult learners and their perceptions of learning using computer-based learning materials, mainly Learndirect packages. The findings are based on focus group interviews with learners in a range of settings, including centres in community-based organisations, further education colleges and private training providers based in the Midlands region of England. The research forms part of a larger study of partnership working and its role in widening participation in lifelong learning in the Black Country sub-region of England, but this article will focus specifically on the data from focus group interviews with learners. The findings reported here provide an insight into the ability of learners to articulate the benefits and the weakness of learning in this way, and to be clear about their learning goals. The data reveal aspects of the physical, social and psychological learning environment, which help learners participate in learning. This is, of course, useful for practitioners, but the individual stories also reveal deeper and more hurtful previous experiences, which cannot be tackled by tinkering with the learning environment or the learning materials.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record