• Script Proposals in Undergraduate Supervision

      West, Marion (Hacettepe University, 2018-07)
      This article explores a particular interactional practice surrounding advice in undergraduate supervision. Script proposals allow advice-givers to individualise their advice, minimise resistance and provide a model while not undermining the client’s agency (Emmison, Butler and Danby 2011). This device has been studied primarily in helpline interactions (Hepburn, Wilkinson and Butler 2014) but not yet in higher education. The audio-recorded data are from a meeting in which the tutor addresses student concerns regarding her writing process and referencing conventions. Several hallmarks of script proposals are present, including the student’s previously displayed stance, the use of idiom, three part-lists (Jefferson 1990) and contrastive pairs. Membership categories are exploited to both include and exclude the student. The enactment of supervisory roles and qualities such as empathy is analysed and then discussed through the conceptual lens of the psychological contract (Cureton and Cousin 2012) and the educational alliance (Telio, Ajjawi and Regehr 2015). While also fulfilling her tutor-mentor role, in that she supports the student in her own decisions, the tutor acts as director or project manager (Derounian 2011), taking the student through the steps in the process in a logical order (Rowley and Slack 2004). The implications for practical applications are briefly considered.
    • Independent learning – what we do when you’re not there

      Hockings, Christine; Thomas, Liz; Ottaway, Jim; Jones, Rob; College of Learning and Teaching, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK; Higher Education Research and Consultancy, York, UK; Quiddity Research, London, UK; Higher Education Research and Consultancy, York, UK (Taylor & Francis, 2017-06-22)
      Independent learning is one of the cornerstones of UK higher education yet it is poorly understood by students and is seen by politicians as a poor substitute for face to face teaching. This paper explores students’ understandings, approaches and experiences of independent learning and how they may become more effective independent learners. This large scale qualitative study, funded by the HEA, included students-as-researchers, independent learning diaries, and student-led interviews. Findings suggest that students initially use low level reinforcing and organising skills and in later stages of their courses develop higher level extending and applying skills. Clearer guidance, clearer tasks and in-course support are amongst the students’ recommendations for enhancing independent learning. However the most powerful influence on their independent learning was the support, collaboration and advice of other (more experienced) students in non-assessed scenarios. These findings have implications for staff involved in induction, student support, curriculum design and for staff and officers in Students’ Unions.
    • An automatic method for assessing the teaching impact of books from online academic syllabi

      Kousha, Kayvan; Thelwall, Mike; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK (2016-12)
    • Economic motives to attend university: a cross-country study

      Bartram, Brendan (Taylor & Francis, 2016-10-26)
      This paper considers students’ economic motives to attend university. Drawing on selected results from a tri-national survey involving online questionnaires and interviews with students at English, German and Portuguese universities, it examines and compares this particular extrinsic motivational dimension, alongside the influence of the national economic contexts within which the students are located. The findings suggest a strong consensus across all three settings in relation to high levels of motivation driven by the students’ economic goals – careers, qualifications and future income – irrespective of background variables and fee structures. An exploration of the impact of the broader economic climate, however, reveals a more fragmented picture. The differences revealed between national settings offer tentative evidence that the students’ perceptions of their country’s economic situation does have a differential impact on their decision to take up university studies.
    • ‘Career and Money Aside, What's the Point of University?’ A Comparison of Students’ Non-economic Entry Motives in Three European Countries

      Bartram, Brendan; University of Wolverhampton (Wiley, 2016-05-16)
      his paper explores students’ non-economic motives for attending university. Drawing on the results of a tri-national survey involving online questionnaires and email interviews with education students at English, German and Portuguese universities, it compares and discusses the extent to which the participants are motivated by a number of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. In contrast to certain other studies, the findings reveal a strong consensus across all three settings in relation to certain motivational elements—strong intrinsic desires for self-improvement and low motivations driven by social pressures or seeing university as a default option. More pronounced national differences emerge, however, regarding motives to contribute to society and the appeal of the social dimension of university life. The paper interprets the similarities and differences revealed and considers a number of conclusions.
    • Typologies of Interventions in Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 6a

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • Technical Data on Typologies of Interventions in Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 6b

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • The characteristics of a Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) project. Report 3

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • Case studies of Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Networks (KEEN). Report 8

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • Survey Analysis Report on what happens in a Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) project. Report 7

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • Methodology for Investigating Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 5

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • Executive Summary of what happens in a Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) project. (Report 1)

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • Literature Review for Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) Research. Report 4

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • A summary of research into Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 2

      Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
    • Emotion as a Student Resource in Higher Education

      Bartram, Brendan (Taylor & Francis, 2014-11-20)
      This article offers a critical examination of students’ emotional bargaining in higher education. Based on an analysis of student emails and staff interviews, the article uses a case-study approach to explore the nature of this behaviour and the motivational drivers behind it. The paper reveals an amalgam of socio-cultural and educational factors, identifying the particular importance of a neo-liberally inflected climate.
    • Notions of effective teaching: an exploration of students’ and lecturers’ perceptions of first year Education undergraduates

      Allan, Joanna; Clarke, Karen; Jopling, Michael (IASK (International Association for the Scientific Knowledge), 2008)
    • '......do that and I'll raise your grade'. Innovative module design and recursive feedback

      Prowse, Steve; Duncan, Neil; Hughes, Julie; Burke, Deirdre (Routledge, 2007)
      In an attempt to ensure students had a positive experience in their first semester, and to encourage future effective use of tutors' feedback comments, a post-1992 university used a module in the school of education to develop an innovative feedback process. The process involved four stages: a first submission of written work, written feedback on that work, viva on student understanding of feedback, and final submission of written work. Between the viva and final submission, students could choose to improve their work for a specified number of grade points. The innovation was met favourably by students, and overall grades were improved against the previous iteration of the module. The project showed promise for adaptation in other forms for use across the University, though some ideological issues around assessment remain unresolved. The matter of the innovation and institutional quality standards is discussed in detail.
    • The Quest for deeper learning: an investigation into the impact of a WebQuest in primary initial teacher training

      Allan, Joanna; Street, Mark (Blackwell Synergy, 2007)
      This paper explores the impact on learning in higher education of the integration of a knowledge-pooling stage into a WebQuest. We explain the concept of WebQuests, consider recent literature regarding the effects and difficulties of this approach to learning, and examine students' perceptions of the impact of this tool on high-order learning. The level of learning achieved by respondents is analysed using Biggs' Structure of the Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO) taxonomy. With judicious use of a ‘pooling knowledge stage’, and provided that students are fully aware of the desired learning outcomes, the findings suggest that WebQuests do have the potential to promote high-order learning. The paper concludes by suggesting the need for further research into the potential of WebQuests to promote high-order learning within different disciplines in higher education.
    • 'Academic engagement' within a widening participation context—a 3D analysis

      Hockings, Christine; Cooke, Sandra; Bowl, Marion (Routledge, 2007)
      The growth in the student population within higher education against a background of government policy promoting the concept of 'widening participation' has led to much debate about the nature of university teaching. Academic engagement of all students within increasingly large and diverse classrooms has proved difficult to achieve. The research that we report here is part of a two-year ESRC/TLRP-funded project, whose key aim is to develop strategies for encouraging academic engagement and participation of all students by creating inclusive learning environments. In this paper, we report on the first stage of this project by exploring some of the sociological, epistemological and pedagogical reasons why learning environments may impact differently on first year students. We do this by asking over 200 'pre-entry students' what conceptions they have about higher education, university teachers, their subject and themselves as learners prior to enrolment at university. We consider how these conceptions might influence how they engage in, and benefit from, learning at university.