Recent Submissions

  • An automatic method for assessing the teaching impact of books from online academic syllabi

    Kousha, Kayvan; Thelwall, Mike; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK (2016-12)
  • Independent learning – what we do when you’re not there

    Hockings, Christine; Thomas, Liz; Ottaway, Jim; Jones, Rob; College of Learning and Teaching, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK; Higher Education Research and Consultancy, York, UK; Quiddity Research, London, UK; Higher Education Research and Consultancy, York, UK (Taylor & Francis, 2017-06-22)
    Independent learning is one of the cornerstones of UK higher education yet it is poorly understood by students and is seen by politicians as a poor substitute for face to face teaching. This paper explores students’ understandings, approaches and experiences of independent learning and how they may become more effective independent learners. This large scale qualitative study, funded by the HEA, included students-as-researchers, independent learning diaries, and student-led interviews. Findings suggest that students initially use low level reinforcing and organising skills and in later stages of their courses develop higher level extending and applying skills. Clearer guidance, clearer tasks and in-course support are amongst the students’ recommendations for enhancing independent learning. However the most powerful influence on their independent learning was the support, collaboration and advice of other (more experienced) students in non-assessed scenarios. These findings have implications for staff involved in induction, student support, curriculum design and for staff and officers in Students’ Unions.
  • Economic motives to attend university: a cross-country study

    Bartram, Brendan (Taylor & Francis, 2016-10-26)
    This paper considers students’ economic motives to attend university. Drawing on selected results from a tri-national survey involving online questionnaires and interviews with students at English, German and Portuguese universities, it examines and compares this particular extrinsic motivational dimension, alongside the influence of the national economic contexts within which the students are located. The findings suggest a strong consensus across all three settings in relation to high levels of motivation driven by the students’ economic goals – careers, qualifications and future income – irrespective of background variables and fee structures. An exploration of the impact of the broader economic climate, however, reveals a more fragmented picture. The differences revealed between national settings offer tentative evidence that the students’ perceptions of their country’s economic situation does have a differential impact on their decision to take up university studies.
  • ‘Career and Money Aside, What's the Point of University?’ A Comparison of Students’ Non-economic Entry Motives in Three European Countries

    Bartram, Brendan; University of Wolverhampton (Wiley, 2016-05-16)
    his paper explores students’ non-economic motives for attending university. Drawing on the results of a tri-national survey involving online questionnaires and email interviews with education students at English, German and Portuguese universities, it compares and discusses the extent to which the participants are motivated by a number of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. In contrast to certain other studies, the findings reveal a strong consensus across all three settings in relation to certain motivational elements—strong intrinsic desires for self-improvement and low motivations driven by social pressures or seeing university as a default option. More pronounced national differences emerge, however, regarding motives to contribute to society and the appeal of the social dimension of university life. The paper interprets the similarities and differences revealed and considers a number of conclusions.
  • Emotion as a Student Resource in Higher Education

    Bartram, Brendan (Taylor & Francis, 2014-11-20)
    This article offers a critical examination of students’ emotional bargaining in higher education. Based on an analysis of student emails and staff interviews, the article uses a case-study approach to explore the nature of this behaviour and the motivational drivers behind it. The paper reveals an amalgam of socio-cultural and educational factors, identifying the particular importance of a neo-liberally inflected climate.
  • Case studies of Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Networks (KEEN). Report 8

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Survey Analysis Report on what happens in a Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) project. Report 7

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Technical Data on Typologies of Interventions in Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 6b

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Typologies of Interventions in Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 6a

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Methodology for Investigating Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 5

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Literature Review for Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) Research. Report 4

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • The characteristics of a Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) project. Report 3

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • A summary of research into Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 2

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Executive Summary of what happens in a Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) project. (Report 1)

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Feed-forward: Improving students' use of tutors' comments.

    Duncan, Neil (London: Taylor & Francis, 2007)
    A small-scale action research project was carried out on students' feedback histories on one undergraduate module. Old grades and comment sheets were collected and analysed by staff for recurring advice to individual students on the target module. This advice was then synthesized to create simple individual learning plans for the students' forthcoming assignments, in other words old feedback was applied to a new task. A number of additional teaching and learning interventions were provided for participants and the statistical outcomes showed a small gain in the grades achieved against those who did not participate. Interviews were held with participants that indicated a number of reasons why feedback was not optimized to assist further learning.
  • The good, the bad and the ugly – secondary pupils’ views of good and bad practice in MFL teaching.

    Bartram, Brendan (nfer (National Foundation for Educational Research), 2007)
    What do our pupils really think of us as teachers? Brendan Bartram conducted some research with pupils in England, Germany and the Netherlands to find out what they thought of their modern foreign language teachers.
  • Student drop-out: an investigation into reasons for students leaving Bioscience programmes in one new university, over a period of five years.

    Allan, Joanna; Bentley, Hilary (Stafford: Staffordshire University, 2006)
    The impetus for supporting the development of students’ learning in higher education (HE) comes as a result of the impact of a range of factors affecting the profile of undergraduate students world-wide. In the UK, the widening participation agenda is a key driver that is predicated on the premise that ‘we cannot afford to waste talent simply because of a reluctance to foster it’ (HEFCE, 2006: 9). In seeking to address the discrepancies in the participation rates between different social classes, universities in the UK are offering fair access to HE to disabled students, mature students and men and women from all ethnic backgrounds. Modern universities (founded post- 1992) especially have found that large numbers of students now come from non-traditional backgrounds, and that there are difficulties associated with supporting and fostering learning where students’ prior educational experiences are very varied (Bamber and Tett, 2000; McInnis, 2001; Zeegers and Martin, 2001). There is little value for HE institutions in attracting students on to courses if they subsequently drop out of their studies, but the factors influencing attrition rates are both wide-ranging and complex.
  • Notions of effective teaching: an exploration of students’ and lecturers’ perceptions of first year Education undergraduates

    Allan, Joanna; Clarke, Karen; Jopling, Michael (IASK (International Association for the Scientific Knowledge), 2008)
  • Practising what we preach? Contradictions between pedagogy and practice in the move to problem-based learning

    Hockings, Christine (Maidenhead: Open University Press, 2004)
    This chapter explores the challenges facing individual lecturers as they make the transition from traditional teaching to problem-based learning. This case study highlights the conceptual, epistemological and pedagogical challenges such a shift presents and suggests ways in which academics can be supported through this process in order to improve student learning. It is of significance to academic developers and practitioners.

View more