Recent Submissions

  • From fragmentation to multiplexity: Decentralisation, localism and support for school collaboration in England and Wales

    Jopling, Michael; Hadfield, Mark (Waxmann Verlag GmbH, 2017-12-07)
    Decentralisation and localism have become increasingly common drivers and outcomes of policy changes in many education systems in recent years, often supported by an emphasis on collaboration. This paper uses research into three collaborative initiatives in England and Wales to explore these changes. Informed by insights from network theory, it reveals a number of issues and tensions relating to decentralisation and localism and ends with a call to move away from a defi cit perspective in order to use the multiplexity of current systems as a starting point for future developments in policy and research.
  • An automatic method for assessing the teaching impact of books from online academic syllabi

    Kousha, Kayvan; Thelwall, Mike; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK; Statistical Cybermetrics Research Group; School of Mathematics and Computer Science; University of Wolverhampton; Wulfruna Street Wolverhampton WV1 1LY UK (2016-12)
  • Enhancing school leadership through an international study visit

    Cramp, Andy (Taylor & Francis, 2016)
    This paper explores the outcomes of a school leadership study visit to India. The research critiques the competency based frameworks common in English leadership development programmes and argues instead, for an approach that challenges assumptions in a fresh context for learning and considers leadership as a process of humanisation. Using Mezirow's 'perspective transformations' as a starting point, the paper briefly outlines what was learned on the visit; but more importantly, the paper focuses on how that learning took place. Activities that proved particularly valuable are discussed. Importantly, the research found that informal opportunities for learning sliding into the spaces around formal events, were often responsible for unexpected and influential perspective transformations and that these opportunities for learning are often undervalued. The research concludes that international study visits where participants agree their own collective agendas and develop a trusted validating community group are more valuable than transmission models of leadership learning. Finally, the paper briefly returns to the notion of leadership as a process of humanisation and suggests that seen in this way, the pursuit of community becomes a more highly valued outcome for leadership learning.
  • Independent learning – what we do when you’re not there

    Hockings, Christine; Thomas, Liz; Ottaway, Jim; Jones, Rob; College of Learning and Teaching, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK; Higher Education Research and Consultancy, York, UK; Quiddity Research, London, UK; Higher Education Research and Consultancy, York, UK (Taylor & Francis, 2017-06-22)
    Independent learning is one of the cornerstones of UK higher education yet it is poorly understood by students and is seen by politicians as a poor substitute for face to face teaching. This paper explores students’ understandings, approaches and experiences of independent learning and how they may become more effective independent learners. This large scale qualitative study, funded by the HEA, included students-as-researchers, independent learning diaries, and student-led interviews. Findings suggest that students initially use low level reinforcing and organising skills and in later stages of their courses develop higher level extending and applying skills. Clearer guidance, clearer tasks and in-course support are amongst the students’ recommendations for enhancing independent learning. However the most powerful influence on their independent learning was the support, collaboration and advice of other (more experienced) students in non-assessed scenarios. These findings have implications for staff involved in induction, student support, curriculum design and for staff and officers in Students’ Unions.
  • Economic motives to attend university: a cross-country study

    Bartram, Brendan (Taylor & Francis, 2016-10-26)
    This paper considers students’ economic motives to attend university. Drawing on selected results from a tri-national survey involving online questionnaires and interviews with students at English, German and Portuguese universities, it examines and compares this particular extrinsic motivational dimension, alongside the influence of the national economic contexts within which the students are located. The findings suggest a strong consensus across all three settings in relation to high levels of motivation driven by the students’ economic goals – careers, qualifications and future income – irrespective of background variables and fee structures. An exploration of the impact of the broader economic climate, however, reveals a more fragmented picture. The differences revealed between national settings offer tentative evidence that the students’ perceptions of their country’s economic situation does have a differential impact on their decision to take up university studies.
  • ‘Career and Money Aside, What's the Point of University?’ A Comparison of Students’ Non-economic Entry Motives in Three European Countries

    Bartram, Brendan; University of Wolverhampton (Wiley, 2016-05-16)
    his paper explores students’ non-economic motives for attending university. Drawing on the results of a tri-national survey involving online questionnaires and email interviews with education students at English, German and Portuguese universities, it compares and discusses the extent to which the participants are motivated by a number of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. In contrast to certain other studies, the findings reveal a strong consensus across all three settings in relation to certain motivational elements—strong intrinsic desires for self-improvement and low motivations driven by social pressures or seeing university as a default option. More pronounced national differences emerge, however, regarding motives to contribute to society and the appeal of the social dimension of university life. The paper interprets the similarities and differences revealed and considers a number of conclusions.
  • Emotion as a Student Resource in Higher Education

    Bartram, Brendan (Taylor & Francis, 2014-11-20)
    This article offers a critical examination of students’ emotional bargaining in higher education. Based on an analysis of student emails and staff interviews, the article uses a case-study approach to explore the nature of this behaviour and the motivational drivers behind it. The paper reveals an amalgam of socio-cultural and educational factors, identifying the particular importance of a neo-liberally inflected climate.
  • The International Council for Adult Education and Adult Learning Policy: Addressing the Gap between Rhetoric and Practice

    Tuckett, Alan (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015)
    The first decade of the twenty-first century began with high hopes for improved opportunities for adult learners. In 1996 a UNESCO committee produced Learning: The Treasure Within (Delors, 1996), and in the same year the finance ministers of OECD countries agreed to give new impetus to lifelong learning policies since human capital was of central importance to the prosperity of industrialized economies (OECD, 1996; Rubenson, 2009; Schuller, 2009). These initiatives were followed by two key global events at which governments signed agreements to improve opportunities for the education of adults. CONFINTEA V, which was held in Hamburg in 1997, had established a broad developmental agenda for adult education (Nesbit and Welton, 2013) which recognized its distinctive role, both as a key part of the structured educational system and as a catalyst in achieving improvements to health and wellbeing, in industrial development, and in securing vibrant democracies through their active and engaged citizens (UNESCO, 1997). In 2000 the education agenda that had been agreed a decade earlier at Jomtien, Thailand, was reviewed and strengthened at the World Education Forum (UNESCO, 2000), which was held in Dakar, Senegal. Six global goals were agreed upon, including halving the rate of illiteracy by 2015; securing gender equality in access to education for girls and women; and, more vaguely, meeting the learning needs of all young people and adults through equitable access to appropriate learning and life-skills programmes (UNESCO, 2000).
  • Case studies of Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Networks (KEEN). Report 8

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Survey Analysis Report on what happens in a Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) project. Report 7

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Technical Data on Typologies of Interventions in Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 6b

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Typologies of Interventions in Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 6a

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Methodology for Investigating Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 5

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Literature Review for Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) Research. Report 4

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • The characteristics of a Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) project. Report 3

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • A summary of research into Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) projects. Report 2

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Executive Summary of what happens in a Knowledge Exchange and Enterprise Network (KEEN) project. (Report 1)

    Boucher, David; Jones, Andrew; Lyons, Gillian; Royle, Karl; Saleem, Shazad; Simeon, Paula; Stokes, Michael (University of Wolverhampton Business Solutions, 2015-10-20)
  • Reading Reader Identities: Stories about Young Adults Reading.

    Kendall, Alex (Lancaster: Lancaster University, RaPAL / Stevenage: Avantibooks, 2007)
    Alex Kendall is Associate Dean for Education at the University of Wolverhampton. Whilst this role involves her in a broad range of educational work, her focus as a teacher educator and research lies in the areas of initial teacher education and continuing professional development programmes for adult literacy specialists. Background In 2002 The Times Higher Education supplement ran a report which challenged and reoriented my thinking about reading and readers and had a profound impact on the theorising I then was immersed in as part of the PhD research process. The report sought to re-present a selection of the findings from a reading habits survey I had (tentatively) presented to the British Educational Research conference a few weeks previously. The report entitled 'Books lose out to tabloids' read, "Half of the FE students taking English courses in a deprived part of the Midlands rarely or never read for pleasure, according to a survey of students aged sixteen to nineteen at seven colleges in the Black Country. Their most popular reading matter is tabloid newspapers and magazines. Four out of five of the 340 students surveyed were studying for A-levels and three-quarters were female, yet 15 per cent said they never read for pleasure and 34 per cent did not do so regularly. The rest read for pleasure at least once or twice a week but only 3 per cent did so every day. Most preferred to socialise and watch TV. The findings were presented to last week's British Educational Research Association conference by Alex Kendall of the University of Wolverhampton. They supported views of college teachers who told her many A-level students had "poor reading skills and weak vocabulary" and few read beyond their coursework." (Passmore, 2002: 32) Some months later the press office at my University was contacted by a BBC Radio researcher who had come across the BERA abstract via the TES article and wanted to invite me to contribute to a late night BBC radio discussion programme addressed to the BBC' Big Read' campaign. The "students don't read novels" quote in the TES article had caught the researcher's eye and I was invited to share my knowledge about the 'illiteracy’ of young people and also to identify a high consuming or idiosyncratic reader who might also join the discussion. The research seemed 'instinctively’ to be making a connection between students choices about not to read novels and the degree to which they were or weren't 'literate'. And indeed it was not implied that the 'interesting' reader might be found amongst the student participants.
  • Giving up reading: re-imagining reading with young adult readers.

    Kendall, Alex (Lancaster: Lancaster University / Stevenage: Avantibooks, 2008)
    Alex is associate dean at the University of Wolverhampton with responsibility for undergraduate awards, post-compulsory teacher education and the Black Country Skills for Life professional development centre, BLEND. Alex also teaches [less than she would like] on the literacy & language CPD programmes at Wolverhampton. Background: In this article I explore the thoughts and reflections of young adults from the Black Country in the West Midlands about what it means to read and to be a reader. Beginning with discussions of newspaper reading I suggest that whilst the participants in this study were likely to feel comfortable with their 'technical skills' as readers they were not always so confident in their abilities to 'grasp', as they saw it, the 'correct' meanings of the texts they read, most Especially those they encountered in the course of their studies at college. Drawing on data collected in relation to 'reading for pleasure' begin to consider the ways in which new media textualities, in this case gaming, may offer young adults new ways of being as readers that although both pleasurable and motivating find little legitimate expression within educational spaces. I make use of Gee's notions of active and critical learning to suggest that if the reading subject identities constructed through schooled literacy are to be meaningful (valued) and useful (permit learners to exercise power as readers perhaps even in ways that are not predictable, or we I dare to say, desirable) to young adult readers then a broader range of theoretical understandings must be brought to bear on practice. These seem pertinent in the environment of Web 2.0 (O'Reilly, 2007) and Media 2 .0 (McDougall, 2007; Gauntlett 2008) which seems at once to offer both exciting new possibilities for young people to enact reading (and writing) and to further trouble the possibility of a proximal relationship between educational and cultural life world literacy identities. I go on to consider what might usefully be learnt about reading by beginning to theorise the enjoyment young adults find in out of college textual experience. The findings of this article may be of interest to those involved in the teaching of reading as they illustrate compellingly the need for pedagogical approaches to reading and literacy that not only take serious account of the social practices through which readers experience text but which rigorously theorise the making and taking of meaning and in so doing teach learners to "really read" ( Gee, 2003: 16).

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