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dc.contributor.authorLane, Andrew M.
dc.contributor.authorBeedie, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorTerry, Peter C.
dc.date.accessioned2007-07-19T14:32:25Z
dc.date.available2007-07-19T14:32:25Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.date.submitted2004-03
dc.identifier.citationBeedie, C.J., Terry, P.C., & Lane, A.M. (2005). Distinctions between emotion and mood. Cognition and Emotion, 19 (6), pp 847-878.
dc.identifier.issn0269-9931
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02699930541000057
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/12841
dc.description.abstractMost academics agree that emotions and moods are related but distinct phenomena. The present study assessed emotion-mood distinctions among a non-academic population and compared these views with distinctions proposed in the literature. Content analysis of responses from 106 participants identified 16 themes, with cause (65% of respondents), duration (40%), control (25%), experience (15%) and consequences (14%) the most frequently cited distinctions. Among 65 contributions to the academic literature, eight themes were proposed, with duration (62% of authors), intentionality (41%), cause (31%), consequences (31%) and function (18%) the most frequently cited. When the eight themes cited by both academics and non-academics were rank ordered, approximately 60% overlap in opinion was evident. A data-derived summary of emotion-mood distinctions is provided. These data should prove useful to investigators interested in developing a clearer scientific distinction between emotion and mood than is currently available.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.format.extent230400 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02699930541000057
dc.subjectEmotion
dc.subjectMood
dc.titleDistinctions between Emotion and Mood
dc.typeJournal article
dc.identifier.journalCognition and Emotion
dc.source.volume19
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage847
dc.source.endpage878
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-03T09:44:54Z
html.description.abstractMost academics agree that emotions and moods are related but distinct phenomena. The present study assessed emotion-mood distinctions among a non-academic population and compared these views with distinctions proposed in the literature. Content analysis of responses from 106 participants identified 16 themes, with cause (65% of respondents), duration (40%), control (25%), experience (15%) and consequences (14%) the most frequently cited distinctions. Among 65 contributions to the academic literature, eight themes were proposed, with duration (62% of authors), intentionality (41%), cause (31%), consequences (31%) and function (18%) the most frequently cited. When the eight themes cited by both academics and non-academics were rank ordered, approximately 60% overlap in opinion was evident. A data-derived summary of emotion-mood distinctions is provided. These data should prove useful to investigators interested in developing a clearer scientific distinction between emotion and mood than is currently available.


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