Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHassall, John
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-26T10:31:23Z
dc.date.available2007-04-26T10:31:23Z
dc.date.issued1998-09
dc.date.submitted2007-04-26
dc.identifier.issn1363-6839
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/11372
dc.description.abstractThe paper examines the role of decision support, or “choice making” systems and models based upon three groupings of ideas (or frameworks). Firstly, the philosophy of choice is examined with reference to the viewpoints of classicism, modernism and post-modernism as they relate to the way in which preferences are determined and valorised. Secondly, this tripartite framework is examined with reference to the philosophical works of Soren Kierkegaard who is sometimes regarded as the first existentialist philosopher. Third, some parallels are drawn between the models and frameworks thus far described and the psychotherapeutic model developed (initially) by Eric Berne, known as Transactional Analysis. Finally, a review and synthesis of some of the ideas introduced is attempted.
dc.format.extent-1 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhampton
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWorking paper
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWP019/98
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wlv.ac.uk/PDF/uwbs_WP018-98%20Hassall.pdf
dc.subjectInformation systems
dc.subjectChoice
dc.subjectModernism
dc.subjectPostmodernism
dc.subjectClassicism
dc.titleInformation systems to support choice: a philosophical and phenomenological exploration
dc.typeWorking paper
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-21T09:44:44Z
html.description.abstractThe paper examines the role of decision support, or “choice making” systems and models based upon three groupings of ideas (or frameworks). Firstly, the philosophy of choice is examined with reference to the viewpoints of classicism, modernism and post-modernism as they relate to the way in which preferences are determined and valorised. Secondly, this tripartite framework is examined with reference to the philosophical works of Soren Kierkegaard who is sometimes regarded as the first existentialist philosopher. Third, some parallels are drawn between the models and frameworks thus far described and the psychotherapeutic model developed (initially) by Eric Berne, known as Transactional Analysis. Finally, a review and synthesis of some of the ideas introduced is attempted.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Hassall.pdf
Size:
-1bytes
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record