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dc.contributor.authorFullen, Michael A.
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-05T13:36:31Z
dc.date.available2007-04-05T13:36:31Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.date.submitted2007
dc.identifier.citationProgress in Physical Geography, 27(3): 331-358
dc.identifier.issn03091333
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/11145
dc.descriptionMetadata only
dc.description.abstractSoil conservation policies are suggested at national, regional and local levels, including adoption and modification of several Australian, European and North American policies. The Australian Landcare system and programmes of the US Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) are particularly informative. Several European initiatives are promising models, including the strategies of the Danish Land Development Service (Hedeselskabet) and the Icelandic Soil Conservation Service (Landsgraedsla Rikisins). The Erosienormeringsprojekt of South Limburg (The Netherlands) is a coordinated and integrated soil conservation project and seems a particularly useful model for future soil conservation in northern Europe. Several best management practices for soil conservation are identified. These include the promotion of soil conservation by a properly funded and relatively well known soil conservation service and full mapping, monitoring and costing of erosion risk by national soil survey organizations. A participatory approach to soil conservation should be adopted, involving farmers and interested members of the public, and there should be a 'cost share' partnership between government and farmers in funding conservation work on farms. Rational land-use policies need to be developed, such as the promotion of 'set-aside' on erodible soils, grass strips on arable slopes and buffer strips in riparian zones. Education programmes are necessary to actively inform the public on the importance of soil as a resource. These schemes should particularly encourage 'land literacy' among participants. It is imperative that the broader societal benefits of effective soil conservation are recognized, such as its potential contribution to habitat creation, biodiversity and carbon sequestration.
dc.format.extent151561 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSage
dc.relation.urlhttp://ppg.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/27/3/331
dc.subjectSoil erosion
dc.subjectSoil conservation
dc.subjectNorthern Europe
dc.subjectLand use
dc.subjectDenmark
dc.subjectIceland
dc.titleSoil erosion and conservation in northern Europe
dc.typeJournal article
dc.format.digYES
html.description.abstractSoil conservation policies are suggested at national, regional and local levels, including adoption and modification of several Australian, European and North American policies. The Australian Landcare system and programmes of the US Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) are particularly informative. Several European initiatives are promising models, including the strategies of the Danish Land Development Service (Hedeselskabet) and the Icelandic Soil Conservation Service (Landsgraedsla Rikisins). The Erosienormeringsprojekt of South Limburg (The Netherlands) is a coordinated and integrated soil conservation project and seems a particularly useful model for future soil conservation in northern Europe. Several best management practices for soil conservation are identified. These include the promotion of soil conservation by a properly funded and relatively well known soil conservation service and full mapping, monitoring and costing of erosion risk by national soil survey organizations. A participatory approach to soil conservation should be adopted, involving farmers and interested members of the public, and there should be a 'cost share' partnership between government and farmers in funding conservation work on farms. Rational land-use policies need to be developed, such as the promotion of 'set-aside' on erodible soils, grass strips on arable slopes and buffer strips in riparian zones. Education programmes are necessary to actively inform the public on the importance of soil as a resource. These schemes should particularly encourage 'land literacy' among participants. It is imperative that the broader societal benefits of effective soil conservation are recognized, such as its potential contribution to habitat creation, biodiversity and carbon sequestration.


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