Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDowzer, Clare N.
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorCable, Nigel T.
dc.contributor.authorNevill, Alan M.
dc.date.accessioned2007-04-04T13:21:38Z
dc.date.available2007-04-04T13:21:38Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.date.submitted2007-03-14
dc.identifier.citationErgonomics, 42(2): 275-281
dc.identifier.issn0014-0139
dc.identifier.issn1366-5847(online)
dc.identifier.pmid10024847
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/11128
dc.description.abstractThe maximal physiological responses to treadmill running (TMR), shallow water running (SWR) and deep water running (DWR) while wearing a buoyancy vest were compared in 15 trained male runners. Measurements included oxygen consumption (VO2 max), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and heart rate (HR). Treadmill running elicited VO2 max and HRmax, which were higher than the peaks attained in both water tests (p < 0.01). VO2 peak averaged 83.7 and 75.3% of VO2 max for SWR and DWR respectively. Peak HR for SWR and DWR were 94.1 and 87.2% of the HRmax reached in the TMR. RER responses were similar between the three modalities. The observations suggest that the training stimulus provided by water is still adequate for supplementary training. While SWR is potentially an efficient method of maintaining cardiovascular fitness, it needs to be investigated further to establish if it is a viable technique for the injured athlete to employ.
dc.format.extent126690 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.relation.urlhttp://direct.bl.uk/bld/PlaceOrder.do?UIN=055733200&ETOC=RN&from=searchenginehttp://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~content=a713808243~db=all
dc.subjectSports Medicine
dc.subjectRunning
dc.subjectTreadmill running
dc.subjectShallow water running
dc.subjectCardiovascular fitness
dc.subjectMale athletes
dc.subjectTraining
dc.subjectFitness
dc.titleMaximal physiological responses to deep and shallow water running.
dc.typeJournal article
dc.format.digYES
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-20T16:28:50Z
html.description.abstractThe maximal physiological responses to treadmill running (TMR), shallow water running (SWR) and deep water running (DWR) while wearing a buoyancy vest were compared in 15 trained male runners. Measurements included oxygen consumption (VO2 max), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and heart rate (HR). Treadmill running elicited VO2 max and HRmax, which were higher than the peaks attained in both water tests (p < 0.01). VO2 peak averaged 83.7 and 75.3% of VO2 max for SWR and DWR respectively. Peak HR for SWR and DWR were 94.1 and 87.2% of the HRmax reached in the TMR. RER responses were similar between the three modalities. The observations suggest that the training stimulus provided by water is still adequate for supplementary training. While SWR is potentially an efficient method of maintaining cardiovascular fitness, it needs to be investigated further to establish if it is a viable technique for the injured athlete to employ.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Nevill20.pdf
Size:
123.7Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record