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dc.contributor.authorKnight, Linda
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-05T13:55:19Z
dc.date.available2010-08-05T13:55:19Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2436/109115
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Wolverhampton for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
dc.description.abstractThis research contains both written and practical elements, that collectively explore stereotypical representations contained in the illustrations of UK - published children's picture books, between 1960-1994. The project is contained by focusing on themes that relate to the metaphoric use of unknown fears, and the anthropomorphic treatment of animals. A major achievement of the research has been to realise and develop a methodology which assesses images through the observation of their contents (identified as the illustrator's professional practice), and provides a structured means of achieving core research intentions. A body of data has been established and compiled, which, through the application of research methodology, extracts specific information relating to research themes/intentions, to act as a factual basis in this under-researched subject. The written element explores and discusses other methodological theories and thematic issues, including intellectual regard towards illustration within educational, literary, and art theory studies, as a means to site the research amongst other arts-related academic works, and to present critical/theoretical prompts for further study in the subject. The practical element has involved the production of a collection of illustrations, that relate to established themes. Practical work was produced via the subliminal/natural response of the illustrator, and was essential as a way of researching theories and concepts that could not be explored purely by language. The collation of written and practical work facilitated an effective investigation into the existence of representational stereotypes, to assess whether their presence is evident/inevitable in the illustrations of children's picture books. The pedagogic/acadernic benefit of the research serves to not only highlight the contents of existing illustrations so that a method for improving visual response (or reflective practice) is established to raise future quality, but to partner other methodological templates for 'reading' images within the general arena of art theory.
dc.formatapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Wolverhampton
dc.titleAn investigation from the view of the illustrator, into the representational stereotypes contained within UK-published, children's picture books, 1960-1994
dc.typeThesis or dissertation
dc.type.qualificationnamePhD
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoral
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-29T15:56:18Z
html.description.abstractThis research contains both written and practical elements, that collectively explore stereotypical representations contained in the illustrations of UK - published children's picture books, between 1960-1994. The project is contained by focusing on themes that relate to the metaphoric use of unknown fears, and the anthropomorphic treatment of animals. A major achievement of the research has been to realise and develop a methodology which assesses images through the observation of their contents (identified as the illustrator's professional practice), and provides a structured means of achieving core research intentions. A body of data has been established and compiled, which, through the application of research methodology, extracts specific information relating to research themes/intentions, to act as a factual basis in this under-researched subject. The written element explores and discusses other methodological theories and thematic issues, including intellectual regard towards illustration within educational, literary, and art theory studies, as a means to site the research amongst other arts-related academic works, and to present critical/theoretical prompts for further study in the subject. The practical element has involved the production of a collection of illustrations, that relate to established themes. Practical work was produced via the subliminal/natural response of the illustrator, and was essential as a way of researching theories and concepts that could not be explored purely by language. The collation of written and practical work facilitated an effective investigation into the existence of representational stereotypes, to assess whether their presence is evident/inevitable in the illustrations of children's picture books. The pedagogic/acadernic benefit of the research serves to not only highlight the contents of existing illustrations so that a method for improving visual response (or reflective practice) is established to raise future quality, but to partner other methodological templates for 'reading' images within the general arena of art theory.


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