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Wolverhampton Intellectual Repository and E-Theses > School of Technology > School of Engineering and the Built Environment > Construction and Infrastructure > Longterm grass ley set aside on sandy soils: a case study

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/9866
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Title: Longterm grass ley set aside on sandy soils: a case study
Authors: Fullen, Michael A.
Booth, Colin A.
Citation: Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, 61(4): 236-241
Publisher: Soil and Water Conservation Society
Issue Date: 2006
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2436/9866
Additional Links: http://www.jswconline.org/content/61/4/236.abstract?sid=f021493e-535c-4e12-9890-8d39ee4780cd
Abstract: Investigations assessed the potential contribution of grass-ley set-aside to soil conservation. Ten runoff plots (7 to 15o, 12 to 27 percent gradients) at the Hilton Experimental Site, England, were put to ley in 1991, simulating one specific set-aside land-use. Runoff and erosion rates were low, despite potentially erosive rains. Mean runoff was 0.24 percent of precipitation (standard deviation 0.20), compared with a 15-year mean value of 0.13 percent (standard deviation 0.04) on permanent grassland. Erosion rates decreased to tolerable levels once approximately 30 percent vegetation cover had established and remained low. Under developed ley cover, plot erosion rates were approximately 0.1 to 0.5 t ha-1 yr-1 (mean of 69 plot years 0.21 t ha-1 yr-1). Results suggest erosion rates decrease through time, as the ley cover matures. Soil organic matter content increased consistently and significantly on the set-aside plots (mean of 1.07 percent by weight in 10 years) and soil erodibility significantly decreased. Results suggest using grass-leys for set-aside proves a valuable and viable soil conservation technique, which may contribute to carbon sequestration.
Type: Article
Language: en
Description: Metadata only
Keywords: Carbon sequestration
Runoff plots
Soil erodibility
Soil organic matter
Soil conservation
Grassland
ISSN: 0022-4561
Appears in Collections: Construction and Infrastructure
Plant and Environmental Research Group

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